Breaking Waves: Ocean News

09/17/2018 - 20:21
Green groups say the federal government decision amounts to ‘preferential treatment’ The federal government has ruled the Indian mining company Adani does not have to complete a full environmental impact statement for its application to drastically expand a dam and build a pipeline for its Carmichael coalmine.The project, which Adani calls the north Galilee water scheme, would involve the construction of a 10 billion-litre dam. An existing dam has a capacity of 2.2bn litres. Adani also wants to build 110km of pipeline to transport water from the Suttor river and Burdekin basin. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 17:01
Three years after the Dieselgate scandal erupted, number of highly polluting diesel vehicles on Europe’s roads has risen to 43 million The number of dirty diesel vehicles pumping out toxic emissions on Europe’s streets is still rising three years after the Dieselgate scandal began, according to a new report. More than 7m such cars and vans remain on UK roads alone. There were 29m diesel vehicles whose emissions on the road were significantly higher than official laboratory-based EU limits when the diesel scandal erupted in September 2015. But that has now risen by to 43m, according to analysis by the group Transport & Environment (T&E). France has the most dirty diesels on the road, with 8.7m, followed by Germany’s 8.2m and the UK’s 7.3m. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 16:07
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: U.S. Navy) From: Ocean News Weekly/ By: Ocean Leadership Staff  What It Was The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing titled. “Transportation of Tomorrow: Emerging Technologies That Will Move America.” Why It Matters Safe, reliable maritime transportation is critically important to the blue economy and national security. Marine transportation accounts for 20.6 percent of the GDP in the U.S. ocean and Great Lakes economy, yet the transportation system in America is struggling to keep up with the growing ocean economy. There is a need for innovative solutions to enhance the efficiency of this ever-expanding system both commercially and for the public sector. Experts in private sector innovation offered insight on how federal policy opportunities should engage with these emerging transportation technologies to ensure ocean security.  Key Points While most of the hearing discussed various forms of land transportation, Mr. David Sanford (Campaigns Lead, Naval Ship Intelligence & Technologies, Rolls Royce Marine North America), discussed the innovative technologies in commercial and naval autonomous (also known as unmanned) surface vessels (ASVs). Senator Gary Peters (MI) noted that many transportation stakeholders think the U.S. marine transportation sector is lagging behind other sectors, such as ground and air, in adopting autonomous systems. There are two different types of autonomy in ASVs that replace functions typically done by humans on manned vessels: bridge autonomy and ship autonomy. Both types of autonomy would require shore-side remote operating centers run by professional mariners and engineers to oversee vessels at sea and remotely operate the vessels when near port, but the operators would be able to return home after each shift rather than spending months at sea. Mr. Sanford noted that more than 70 percent of marine accidents are the result of human error or interference and it is expected that ship accidents will be reduced through autonomous systems. Autonomous vehicles’ lower power usage and power demand, and reduced number of systems requiring maintenance at sea could decrease transportation costs by an estimated 20 percent. Ms. Laurie Tolson (Chief Digital Officer, General Electric (GE) Transportation) spoke about GE Transportation’s partnership with the Port of Los Angeles in the pilot implementation of the Port Optimizer, a digital solution that allows ports to plan for arriving vessels as far as two weeks ahead of arrival. As a result, the Port of Los Angeles was able to increase the flow of goods. Cybersecurity was an overarching theme as both ASVs and the Port Optimizer require the transmission of large amounts of data, making them vulnerable to hacking. Ms. Tolson stated that protecting data was a top priority and GE would be diligent in evolving their standards alongside increasing physical and digital networks. Mr. Sanford echoed these statements and additionally added that control of an ASV would be transferred to a local authority to prevent the possibility of a third party gaining control of the ASV as it enters U.S. waters. ASVs and the Port Optimizer still face challenges in the funding, development, and implementation of their technologies. GE is focused on making sure that the Port Optimizer works well before expansion to other ports. ASVs face obstacles in international maritime regulation, export controls, insurance, and increasing communication bandwidth to get information between ASVs and shore side operations. Quotable “…we believe these innovations are coming to a reality, culminating in the development of remote and autonomous shipping that will be safer, more efficient and less expensive to build and operate.” — Mr. David Sanford, Campaigns Lead, Naval Ship Intelligence & Technologies, Rolls Royce Marine North America “It is critical for the US and the domestic shipping industry to begin developing a roadmap to logically address both the opportunities for and the barriers to the development of medium and large unmanned and autonomous surface vessels.” — Mr. David Sanford, Campaigns Lead, Naval Ship Intelligence & Technologies, Rolls Royce Marine North America “Many of the transportation stakeholders feel that the U.S. Transportation sector, marine transportation sector, is significantly lagging behind both the ground and air sectors in our country in adapting automation and autonomy.” — Senator Gary Peters (MI) Find Out More Watch the full hearing Related coverage from the Consortium for Ocean Leadership Jon White – From the President’s Office: 04-30-2018 Unmanned Maritime Systems Benefit From New Legislation Illegal Fishing Part II– How Ocean Science And Technology Can Address IUU Fishing And Secure National, Economic, And Food Security Worldwide Ocean Hack: Innovations In Marine Technology And Monitoring Vessels Without People And A Panel Without NOAA U.S. Coast Guard’s Role In Maritime Security Want to receive articles like this straight to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletter! The post Smooth Sailing For Autonomous Surface Vehicles And Port Optimization In Transportation Hearing appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
09/17/2018 - 15:40
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: Eric Bowles) When Hurricane Florence makes landfall on the North Carolina coastline this week, Catherine Edwards will be hoping the super-storm doesn’t veer toward her home in Savannah, Georgia. But even if Florence maintains a safe distance, Edwards will still have an intimate view of the weather: she’s tracking the hurricane’s path with a remote-controlled underwater ocean glider. (From Wired/ By Eric Niiler) — Edwards, an assistant professor of marine sciences at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, is one of dozens of marine scientists who are gathering data about hurricanes with a new tool: a six-foot long underwater drone, known as a Slocum glider, which carries sensors to measure ocean heat, salinity, and density. Normally, these torpedo-like gliders travel up and down the East Coast and Caribbean mapping the ocean currents that influence short-term weather, long-term climate change, and marine life. Now, these gliders are part of the scientific armada probing Hurricane Florence for data in an effort to help forecasters understand its trajectory and strength. That armada includes at least a dozen Earth-orbiting satellites, hurricane hunter aircraft, and moored ocean buoys. “We made a special push to get the gliders out in advance of the hurricane,” Edwards said. “One is off Cape Hatteras and will be measuring what happens in that quadrant of the storm; the other one is off the Georgia-South Carolina border and will be instrumental in measuring the southern half of the storm.” The gliders measure ocean heat that fuels hurricanes and sends that data back to a shared scientific database used by NOAA’s National Weather Service and other federal weather agencies. Climate scientists say the ocean glider data fills in gaps left by satellite coverage, which only measures the very top of the ocean’s surface and can sometimes lead to errors in hurricane modeling. “The more information we have about ocean temperature… Read the full article here: https://www.wired.com/story/hurricane-florence-underwater-drone-slocum-glider/ The post Member Highlight: Underwater Drones Track Hurricane Florence’s Trajectory appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
09/17/2018 - 13:00
State government’s decision has appalled scientists and conservationists, and widens divide between city and country When the Batemans marine park, not far from my home on the New South Wales south coast, was first created, fishing on a beach next to my property was illegal. Then, under immense pressure from recreational fishers, the zoning throughout the marine park was changed. A few hundred metres offshore stayed a no-take zone but line fishing and spearfishing is now allowed from my local beach. One of my greatest pleasures is to head down to the water with my children and cast into the breakers at dusk, hoping to catch my dinner. The rezoning along the Batemans coast meant substantial areas remained off limits to recreational anglers like me. But there are still more than enough spots to fish throughout the marine park. The tourists still come and everyone who wants to catch a fish can. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 13:00
Exclusive: Research finds claims emissions targets make electricity more expensive are misguided Emissions reduction targets, even relatively ambitious ones, will not drive up power prices for Australian consumers, according to new research from the Australian Council of Social Service (Acoss) and the Brotherhood of St Laurence. While the Morrison government has abandoned the national energy guarantee because conservatives complain that emissions reduction policies drive up power prices, the new research finds that critique is misguided. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 10:54
Extra coal-burning may lead to problems meeting binding carbon targets Britain’s ability to meet its emissions targets is being challenged by a comeback for coal power stations that threatens to drive up the energy sector’s carbon emissions for the first time in six years. Coal plants have become more economic to run than their gas counterparts in the past month because wholesale gas prices have hit 10-year highs. A report by Imperial College London said the extra coal-burning had increased emissions by 15% in September, equivalent to an extra 1,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per hour. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 09:20
Two trains built by the French train maker Alstom are now operating on a 62 mile stretch of line in northern Germany Germany has rolled out the world’s first hydrogen-powered train, signalling the start of a push to challenge the might of polluting diesel trains with costlier but more eco-friendly technology. Two bright blue Coradia iLint trains, built by French TGV-maker Alstom, on Monday began running a 62 mile (100km) route between the towns and cities of Cuxhaven, Bremerhaven, Bremervoerde and Buxtehude in northern Germany – a stretch normally plied by diesel trains. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 05:00
Governor Jerry Brown signed an executive order for statewide carbon neutrality by 2045 Last week, California Governor Jerry Brown signed State Senator and US Senate candidate Kevin de León’s SB 100, which mandates that the state obtain all of its electricity from zero-carbon sources by 2045. That in itself was a big deal, but Brown didn’t stop there; he also issued an executive order calling for the entire California economy to become carbon-neutral by 2045. That’s a huge deal. In order to stay below the Paris climate threshold of 2°C global warming above pre-industrial temperatures, humanity must become carbon-neutral by around 2060 or 2070. If California can meet Brown’s target, it will be providing the rest of the world a blueprint for meeting the Paris target. As the world’s fifth-largest economy, California can provide a powerful roadmap for others to follow. Continue reading...
09/17/2018 - 02:15
Coalition’s backdown follows reversals on stadiums, greyhounds, council amalgamations and emergency services levy The New South Wales government has performed yet another about-face, ditching a proposed ban on fishing at 25 “no take” sanctuary zones in a proposed marine park stretching between Newcastle and Wollongong. Just weeks after the government announced the plan to create the Sydney region marine park, the primary industries minister, Niall Blair, backed down on Monday after sustained opposition from the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers party. Continue reading...