Breaking Waves: Ocean News

07/13/2018 - 08:33
Pacific walruses, Tapanuli orangutan twins and a moon bear are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 06:50
Wholesale prices soar by more than 30% and farmers have to renegotiate with supermarkets Lettuce is being flown in from the US, and imported from Spain and Poland as soaring temperatures increase demand but hit crops in the UK. The cargo carrier IAG Cargo said it had flown 30,000 heads of lettuce from Los Angeles to the UK in the past week alone. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 05:52
Relocation of endangered animals carries risks but loss of half of them is highly unusual Eight out of 14 critically endangered black rhinos have died after being moved to a reserve in southern Kenya, wildlife officials have revealed, in what one conservationist described as “a complete disaster”. Preliminary investigations pointed to salt poisoning as the rhinos tried to adapt to saltier water in their new home, the Kenyan Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife said in a statement. It suspended the moving of other rhinos and said the surviving ones were being closely monitored. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 05:23
Traditional farming shows its benefits as stone barns and hedgerows provide cattle with relief from the heat Sunscreen and waiter service for cows, and a renewed appreciation for traditional countryside structures such as stone barns and hedgerows, are some of the modern and ancient ways in which farmers are trying to cope with the heatwave. Record temperatures and a lack of rainfall have drawn comparisons with 1976, the UK’s biggest drought in living memory. Forecasters say the hot weather is set to continue, probably for weeks. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 04:00
Three African American hikers describe fears and stereotypes they have faced – and why they love hitting the trails Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 00:03
Conservationists, Labor and the Greens condemn clearing over four years More than half a million hectares of forest was cleared in the Great Barrier Reef catchments over four years – an area more than twice the size of the Australian Capital Territory. Official environment and energy department data shows that 596,000 hectares of forest was cleared between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2016. Continue reading...
07/12/2018 - 23:30
Allendale, Northumberland: The dazzling monkey flower is having a bumper year in the upper reaches of the Tyne river system The dry grass prickles my sandalled feet as I cross the biscuit-coloured field towards the East Allen. The green and cool haugh has burned up in the heat, its smell become Mediterranean, an earthy mix of dried clay and hay, bitter and sweet at the same time. The shrunken river threads its way between boulder islands, finding passage between rocks that are normally submerged. This year the monkey flowers are able to grow tall, untrammelled by the fast flow of water, unbattered by wind or flood. The Allen has become a river of gold. Monkey flower, Mimulus guttatus, was first recorded in the wild in Britain in 1824, having escaped from gardens. This non-native species comes from the west coast of North America, where it grows in wet places from sea level to high-altitude meadows. It is now well established along our water courses, around lakes and in damp pastures, setting abundant seed and rooting easily from fragments that get carried downriver. The more floods we have, the more it is likely to increase, so its spread may affect the richness of our riparian plant communities. It is certainly having a bumper year in the upper reaches of the Tyne river system. Continue reading...
07/12/2018 - 12:16
Revival of last eight coal plants when ‘beast from the east’ hit Britain proved to be brief Britain has been powered for more than a thousand hours without coal this year, in a new milestone underscoring how the polluting fuel’s decline is accelerating. The UK’s last eight coal power plants staged a brief revival when the “beast from the east” pushed up gas prices earlier this year, causing coal plants to fire up. Continue reading...
World OCean Radio Has Gone Global
08/20/2014 - 08:40
Aug. 7, 2014 | This is a big week for the World Ocean Observatory. First, it is a major milestone for World Ocean Radio: we broadcast our 300th audio episode since World Ocean Radio first aired in 2009. And second, this week we are announcing the launch of an expansion of World Ocean Radio into four additional languages. A selection of broadcasts (see www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global) are now available in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Swahili, translated from our audio archive and representing an extraordinary opportunity to extend our communication efforts beyond English and into major geographical areas that have been outside our broadcast capacity. We now have the opportunity to offer our radio feature to outlets in France, Spain, Portugal, all the nations in Central and South America, and in certain regions of Africa. World Ocean Radio brings discussion of the ocean and its impact on all aspects of human survival to a global audience. Provided at no cost, this weekly service is intended to provide responsible information and advocacy toward greater understanding of the meaning of the ocean for its rapidly degrading state, the impact on our lives, and a variety of specific actions that can be taken-–both by governments and individuals-–to mitigate the problems, modify behaviors, evolve policies, implement change, broaden public awareness, and build political will. We are extremely proud of this accomplishment and are gratified by the enthusiastic and positive response we get from listeners all over the world. Learn more at http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/about-world-ocean-radio or by visiting http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global Connect with our July newsletter at http://eepurl.com/0p1fH. As always, thank you! ____________________________________________________ Here are five ways to help World Ocean Radio to engage a larger, global audience: 1. Share World Ocean Radio Forward each week's broadcast to everyone you think might be an ally. 2. Link to World Ocean Radio on your organizations' website. Consider how your organization might help by linking to World Ocean Radio on its web page, sharing it among fellow workers, incorporating it into the work it does, and promoting it to the population you serve. 3. Share World Ocean Radio with faculty & students If you are an educational institution, a museum, aquarium, or environmental program, share World Ocean Radio with your faculty and students, incorporate it into curriculum, use it to stimulate and focus discussions, promote it as a membership or community service, share it formally and informally as an educational tool, even use it as a marketing opportunity to recruit new audience with ocean interest to your programs. 4. Explore how these broadcasts might promote mutual goals Identify other partners or associations with which you work and explore ways in which these broadcasts might promote mutual goals and collective objectives by sharing with their constituents to demonstrate professional and collective interest. 5. Look for broadcast outlets in your area, especially if you are a Spanish-, French-, Portuguese-, or Swahili-speaking listener Find local, regional, or national networks, college, community, or environmental radio stations. Recruit them to the ocean cause, linking your organization to World Ocean Radio and growing your outreach and civic engagement. World Ocean Radio can speak loudly and widely for us all. Become its champion; commit to this simple action; make a connection; help us spread a message for the ocean that will be amplified and echoed across the sea that connects us all.
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No Refuge: Tons of Trash Cover Remote Alaskan Shores
07/02/2013 - 09:11
A great article by Carl Safina about the tsunami debris (Japan, 2011) washing up on the remotest shores of the Alaskan wilderness. http://ow.ly/mAk4E
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