Breaking Waves: Ocean News

05/25/2018 - 08:54
Certain types of bacteria and viruses are readily ejected into the atmosphere when waves break; others less so, researchers reported. A team of chemists, oceanographers, microbiologists, geneticists, and pediatric medicine specialists are attempting to understand how far potentially infectious bacteria and viruses can travel and if those that pose the greatest risks to public health are among those most likely to escape the ocean.
05/25/2018 - 07:06
Tesco is to stop using date stamps on own-brand produce. Which fruit and veg improves with age and which loses most nutrients? Best-before dates have expired, at least for fruit and vegetables. This week Tesco revealed it is to stop using the date stamps on almost 70 of its own-brand products in an attempt to tackle food waste. But is older produce as good for you as fresher stuff? Many nutrients, including certain vitamins in fresh produce, are unstable and levels drop after items are harvested. “Micronutrients start to reduce from the moment [produce] is cut, which is why frozen peas are actually better than canned or fresh, as they are frozen soon after picking,” said Adam Hardgrave, a food safety expert from the Food Standards Agency’s foodborne disease control team. Continue reading...
05/25/2018 - 01:24
Minister accused of letting political lobbying interfere with listing a year after recommendation by independent committee • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon Conservation groups have accused the environment and energy minister, Josh Frydenberg, of allowing political interference in the scientific assessment of threatened species listings. Frydenberg has delayed, for the third time, granting an endangered listing to woodlands eligible for protection under Australia’s national environment laws. Continue reading...
05/25/2018 - 01:00
Park visitation is at a record high – good for tourism, not so good for peace and quiet. From Acadia to Zion, Bryce Canyon to Yosemite, leading writers and environmentalists share their alternatives to the most popular spotsFeaturing Bill McKibben, Cynthia Barnett, Ryan Zinke, Leslie Marmon Silko and more … Tell us: which parks and monuments do you think are underappreciated? Location: Northern Minnesota, on the Canadian borderBest place to stay: Camping near Kabetogama lake, for the incredible quietBest entry point: Start paddling from Ash river visitor center Continue reading...
05/25/2018 - 01:00
As the most popular national parks get more crowded, where do you go to escape? Send your tips to publiclands@theguardian.com and we’ll share them below The 22 best US national parks to escape the crowds 10.06pm BST ...and your humble blogger is heeding its call. Thanks for tuning in, and here’s hoping you’re able to get out to somewhere special over the next few days. 10.02pm BST The Channel Islands are just across the water from Los Angeles and are home to small indigenous foxes and other native flora and fauna. Robert Knudson visited on the July 4 weekend last year. Continue reading...
05/25/2018 - 01:00
The Trump administration is quietly seeking to create more African American monuments. For some, it’s been a long wait Nearly two decades ago, Jim Hunn was wandering around a cemetery in Lincoln county, Kentucky, when a small headstone caught his eye. He stared at the name etched on it: Jordan Wallace. Hunn can’t explain exactly why, but he felt an instant attachment. “I got a feeling when I saw it,” he said. Continue reading...
05/25/2018 - 00:00
Nuclear energy is back on the UK government’s agenda. However, concerns about safety have plagued this technology for decades. Given it kills less people than wind, coal or gas, why are we so radiophobic? Ian Sample investigates. Subscribe and review on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom and Mixcloud. Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter By 2050, the UK will have a net zero carbon economy. That, at least, is what the government claims. How it will do this is yet to be decided but it could include projects like growing trees and restoring soils to absorb more carbon from the atmosphere. However, other measures might be met with more opposition: investing in carbon sequestration abroad, phasing out petrol and diesel sooner than 2030 and, potentially, nuclear power. Continue reading...
05/24/2018 - 15:30
WHO database lowers Beijing’s particulate ranking from 40th worst in world to 187th, as coal plants flagged as key culprit Beijing is slowly shedding its image as the world’s most polluted city. In 2013, it ranked as the 40th worst city for the particulate PM2.5 in the World Health Organisation global database. Four years on, thanks in part to a crackdown on polluters, it stands in 187th place. Air pollution in the 62 Chinese cities tracked by the WHO dropped by an average of 30% between 2013 and 2016. China’s air pollution problems are often blamed on the country’s rapid industrial growth but the problems probably date back to the 1950s. Continue reading...
05/24/2018 - 11:41
Michael Gove, the enviroment secretary, responds to a Guardian editorial on his clean air strategy You write that “the main contributor to the air quality crisis … is road transport” (Editorial, 23 May). Road transport contributes 34% of nitrogen dioxide emissions and 12% of particulate matter emissions. The majority of air pollution comes from other sources. In particular, domestic burning contributes 38% of primary particulate matter – the most damaging pollutant to human health, according to the World Health Organisation. You write that our clean air strategy “purported to tackle a public health crisis by getting families to open their windows more often because ‘air pollution inside the home can often be higher than outside’.” Those 11 words are taken from almost 40,000 in the document, which sets out action on domestic fuel, farming, ports, aviation and in other areas. Continue reading...
05/24/2018 - 11:41
Taxpayer’s right to healthcare | ‘Falling’ pregnant | Female film critics | Nancy Banks-Smith | Clothes moths You report (24 May) that Pauline Pennant, a UK citizen living overseas, pays UK taxes through her pension, earned after 30 years working with the NHS, yet is no longer entitled to free healthcare. If she is no longer entitled to this because she lives overseas, then why does she still pay UK tax on her pension and what, or who, is this deducted tax being used for?Lin AldridgeHenley on Thames, Oxfordshire • Once again we read that a woman “had fallen pregnant” (Landmark conviction for forced marriage, 23 May). Since the word “fall” generally indicates a failure of some kind, isn’t it time to replace this antiquated and somewhat sexist expression with the more factual “had become pregnant”?Dr Brigid PurcellNorwich Continue reading...