Breaking Waves: Ocean News

02/20/2019 - 01:00
Washington state’s Democratic governor wants to ‘put the pedal to the metal’ to save the planet The US stands virtually alone in the world in having a leader who openly dismisses the reality of climate change. But amid growing concern among Americans about the overheating planet, one potential 2020 presidential candidate is aiming to hoist climate to the top of the agenda. Jay Inslee, the gravel-voiced governor of Washington, is poised to enter the throng of Democrats vying to dislodge Donald Trump as president in the 2020 election. He’s made some exploratory moves, visiting Nevada and New Hampshire, and said a definitive decision on running will be taken in “weeks”. Continue reading...
02/20/2019 - 01:00
Research shows loss in yields could be offset by reorienting diets away from grain-fed meat Europe would still be able to feed its growing population even if it switched entirely to environmentally friendly approaches such as organic farming, according to a new report from a thinktank. A week after research revealed a steep decline in global insect populations that has been linked to the use of pesticides, the study from European thinktank IDDRI claims such chemicals can be phased out and greenhouse gas emissions radically reduced in Europe through agroecological farming, while still producing enough nutritious food for an increasing population. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 22:43
Scientists invited to collaborate on climate change following mass fish kills and royal commission findings In the wake of mass fish kills in the Menindee Lakes in January and scorching criticism of its stewardship of the Murray-Darling Basin, the Murray-Darling Basin Authority has announced that it will upgrade its scientific work on climate change and the river system. The authority’s chief executive, Phillip Glyde, has invited the scientific community to collaborate on its work on climate change. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 21:24
Case against demolition of Allianz Stadium hears government failed to investigate reports of contamination A legal challenge to the New South Wales government’s controversial plan to demolish Sydney’s Allianz Stadium before next month’s state election has heard the government “suppressed” the release of a report showing the site was contaminated with potentially carcinogenic material. Local Democracy Matters, a group set up to fight the amalgamation of Randwick and Waverley councils 18 months ago, is seeking to halt the demolition of the stadium before the election by arguing the government failed to follow its own planning rules. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 20:09
A million tonnes of spoil to be disposed of in marine park – prompting calls for a ban on all offshore dumping The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority has approved the dumping of more than 1m tonnes of dredge spoil near the reef, using a loophole in federal laws that were supposed to protect the marine park. The Greens senator Larissa Waters has called for the permit – which allows maintenance dredging to be carried out over 10 years at Mackay’s Hay Point port and the sludge to be dumped within the marine park’s boundaries – to be revoked. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 19:48
Flood risk in the region likely to increase by 130% by end of century, modelling shows Houses in flood-hit Townsville and other parts of north Queensland are “on track to become uninsurable”, according to analysis that shows the risk to homes from flooding will more than double under climate change. The modelling, based on current global emissions trajectories, says flooding in Townsville is already about 20% more to likely to occur than previously thought. The total flood risk in the region is likely to increase by 130% by the end of the century. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 19:01
European health report finds Britain has highest mortality rate of countries studied Young Britons are dying from asthma at a higher rate than any of the other European countries examined in a new study, researchers have revealed. Experts have found the UK is languishing near the bottom of an international league table for a host of problems, including obesity, lack of exercise in children and the burden of chronic health issues – and in many cases the situation is getting worse. Continue reading...
02/19/2019 - 16:46
Ocean Leadership ~ From Oil Spills to Funding Bills, and Don’t Forget About our Public Policy Forum on March 13! Just after the Super Bowl that mistakenly left the Saints out was over, the city of New Orleans did get to celebrate as nearly 800 scientists from around the world met in the city for the annual Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science (GoMOSES) conference. With the theme of Minding the Gaps: Research Priorities for Response, Restoration, and Resilience, the conference took a more holistic view of the Gulf of Mexico, looking beyond the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to consider how various stressors contribute to ecological and social resilience and inform response, restoration, and resource management strategies. Experts from academia, state and federal agencies, industry, and nongovernmental organizations shared new studies focused on translating the fundamental and applied research learned since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to advance strategic policy and operational decision making in the region. COL contributes to this event in several ways, primarily by helping facilitate GoMOSES as part of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, one of the 16 conference partners. Additionally, along with the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, COL sponsors the James D. Watkins Student Award for Excellence in Research. Read more about this year’s five student winners on the conference website. I was happy to see Chris D’Elia, one of COL’s trustees and long-time member representative from Louisiana State University, received the Wes Tunnell Lifetime Recognition for Gulf Science and Conservation award (sponsored by GOMURC) for his dedicated work towards a healthy and sustainable Gulf environment and economy. Congratulations and thank you for all you’ve done for the Gulf throughout your career! I’m also pleased to announce registration is now open for COL’s upcoming Public Policy Forum, U.S. Ocean Policy: Past, Present, and Future. Join us March 13 to examine what has been done over the last decade and a half to achieve the recommendations from the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, where we stand now (particularly in terms of federal funding for ocean science and technology research and development), and how the organizing framework of ocean security can help us complete the report’s recommendations and get us to a brighter future for our blue planet. Finally, the spending deal signed Friday funds three of our main ocean science agencies – NSF, NOAA, and NASA – through the rest of the fiscal year. NSF will see a four percent increase (receiving $8.1 billion), NASA Earth Science will get a marginal increase (remaining near $1.9 billion), while NOAA funding will decrease eight percent (dropping to $5.4 billion), which is largely due to a planned funding decrease as satellites transition to the operational phase. A big thank you to the appropriators, staff, and ocean champions who ensured many of COL’s priorities – including funding for the National Oceanographic Partnership Program ($5.5 million); money for NOAA’s aquaculture program and language directing the continuation of regional pilot programs; $127 million for “continuing construction of three Regional Class Research Vessels;” language on marine seismic research recognizing the importance of ensuring the availability of “NSF-funded marine research vessels with unique capabilities;” and funding for key NOAA programs slated for elimination in the president’s budget request, including the National Sea Grant College Program, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, Coastal Zone Management Grants, and the Office of Education. While I am happy to see these items included in the final spending package, these agencies operated under a short-term continuing resolution for four months, not to mention the lost work, time, and opportunities associated with the shutdown. I dream of a future when our federal government realizes that timely and sufficient funding of ocean scientific research in all of our federal agencies is just as important as areas like defense and energy. Climate Of North American Cities Will Shift Hundreds Of Miles In One Generation In one generation, the climate experienced in many North American cities is projected to change to that of locations hundreds of miles away—or to a new climate unlike any found in North America today. A new study and interactive web application, from University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and North Carolina State University, aim to help the public understand how climate change will impact the lives of people who live in urban areas of the United States and Canada. Read our most recent and past newsletters here: http://oceanleadership.org/newsletter-archive/ The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 02-18-2019 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
02/19/2019 - 16:19
Ocean Leadership ~ The Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California San Diego (http://scripps.ucsd.edu) invites applications for a full-time Researcher position to be funded largely by extramural research grants and contracts in any of the research areas listed below. The Researcher series at SIO parallels the Professor series in terms of expectations for research and service but carries no teaching requirements. Researchers receive nine-month appointments with 25% salary support from institutional sources. Externally funded research programs are expected to provide the remaining salary support, including an opportunity for summer salary. Researchers at SIO often obtain lecturer appointments in the SIO department, which provides a mechanism to serve as a graduate student advisor. We seek a motivated, broad-thinking scientist to develop a vigorous research group and provide intellectual leadership in their field while complementing existing expertise in the Biology Section. We are interested in candidates who have demonstrated a commitment to excellence in research as well as service toward building an equitable and diverse scholarly environment. We anticipate hiring at the Assistant Researcher level, but exceptionally well-qualified candidates may be considered for the Associate Researcher or Full Researcher levels. Marine aquaculture research including micro and macroalgae, shellfish, or finfish and may include the basic biology of aquaculture species with application for enhanced productivity. Marine “omics” research including applications of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to address fundamental questions in ocean biosciences and issues related to human health and the oceans. The position requires a PhD, or equivalent degree, in a relevant field at the time of application and candidates should have a competitive record of publication, as well as evidence of the ability to conduct and fund an active research program consistent with the appointment level. It is anticipated that successful candidate will have extramural salary support at the time of appointment. Salary will depend on experience and be based on UCSD pay scales. For full consideration, please apply by the April 1, 2019 deadline at: http://apptrkr.com/1395387 SIO is a world-renowned center of marine research with approximately 200 principal investigators leading research programs on all aspects of earth, ocean, biological and atmospheric sciences. We are committed to academic excellence and diversity within the faculty, staff, and student body. UCSD is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional http://diversity.ucsd.edu commitment to excellence and diversity. The post Assistant Researcher in Marine Aquaculture/Marine Omics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) (Apr. 01) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
02/19/2019 - 16:10
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: Architect of the Capitol) From: Ocean News Weekly/ By: Ocean Leadership Staff  What Passed The 116th Congress began on January 3, 2019, during a partial government shutdown. The shutdown ended after 35 days on January 25, 2019 when the president signed a continuing resolution (CR) (H.J. Res. 28; P.L. 116-5), which includes funding for critically important science agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to extend fiscal year (FY) 2018 funding levels, and reopen the government through February 15. The final FY 2019 appropriations bills (H.R. Res. 31) were signed into law on February 15. What’s New The start of the new Congress brought a surge of new legislation focusing on coastal management. A series of bills introduced in the House were directed at flood insurance, including the Flood Insurance Rate Map Interagency Technology (FIRM IT) Act of 2019 (H.R. 342) and the Taxpayer Exposure Mitigation Act (H.R. 471). The Federally Integrated Species Health (FISH) Act (H.R. 548) would consolidate the management and regulation of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) entirely within the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The ESA is currently administered by both the FWS, under the Department of the Interior, and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), under the Department of Commerce. The FWS holds primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine wildlife, such as whales and anadromous fish, like salmon. Legislation to establish measures to combat invasive lionfish (H.R. 417) was also introduced. Several new bills to close the coasts of New England (H.R. 287); the north, mid-, and south Atlantic (H.R. 291); Florida (H.R. 286); and California (H.R. 279) to offshore oil and gas drilling and exploration were introduced. Additionally, a bill requiring the Secretary of Transportation to conduct a study on the economic and environmental risks to the Great Lakes from oil spills or leaks was introduced in the House (H.R. 795). Bills supporting career and professional development and safety for scientists was a theme in Congress. Bipartisan, bicameral legislation, the Innovators to Entrepreneurs Act of 2019 (H.R. 539 and S. 118) would require the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop an Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program providing formal training to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and other researchers to pursue careers in business. The Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act in 2019 (H.R. 36), similar to legislation introduced in the 115th Congress, would establish an interagency working group with representatives from each federal science agency led by the director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The working group is tasked with expanding research efforts to better understand the factors contributing to sexual harassment in the scientific, technical, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce; developing an inventory of sexual harassment policies at federal science agencies; and then using it to develop a uniform set of policy guidelines. What’s Next Once FY 2019 appropriations bills for the remaining unfunded federal agencies have been signed into law, appropriators will begin working to write and pass appropriations bills for FY 2020. The president’s budget request, which is the first step of this process, is expected to be released in March, although the Office of Management and Budget has yet to confirm a release date. We’ve updated our legislative tracker! Check it out for more detail on each bill, including information on sponsors, cosponsors, committee referrals, and more. Related coverage from the Consortium for Ocean Leadership December’s Congressional Wrap Up Member Highlight: IoT, Data Visualization Warn Coastal Residents about Flooding October And November’s Congressional Wrap Up Sexual Harassment in Science September’s Congressional Wrap Up August’s Congressional Wrap Up Jon White – From the President’s Office: 05-14-2018 Want to receive articles like this straight to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletter! The post January’s Congressional Wrap Up appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.