Breaking Waves: Ocean News

10/16/2018 - 13:52
City firms have hardly covered themselves in glory over the Jamal Khashoggi affair It should be an easy decision for a board of directors to make: after the disappearance of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, it would be obscene to send a corporate representative to next week’s “Davos in the Desert” event in Riyadh. What’s more, it should not be difficult to say so. The list of high-profile dropouts is growing but, sad to report, the British financial establishment has not led the way to the exit. Big-name chief executives from the US – the likes of Jamie Dimon from JP Morgan – pulled out on Monday but the Brits followed only on Tuesday, leaving the impression they jumped only once it was less embarrassing, or commercially safer, to do so. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 12:19
New independent panel may allocate funding based on more varied factors than EU CAP Farming conditions across the UK’s regions are to be assessed for the first time with a view to allocating financial assistance after EU subsidies are withdrawn, the government has said. A new independent advisory panel will consider what factors should determine how future funding is divided among England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, with a remit to look at farm sizes and farm numbers, as well as environmental and socio-economic issues. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 12:00
Leaked letter shows advisory council recommended the Lake Malbena project not be approved One of the first acts of the Morrison government was to greenlight a private tourism development with helicopter access in Tasmanian world heritage wilderness against the recommendation of an expert advisory body. The decision, signed by an environment department assistant secretary on 31 August on behalf of the environment minister, Melissa Price, signalled the luxury camp on remote Halls Island in Lake Malbena was not a threat to matters of national environmental significance and did not need approval under federal laws. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 10:31
Ministers of island states call for help in tackling organised crime in the fishing industry, which they say is harming both the environment and human rights Ministers from tiny island states including Palau, the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are calling for help over the “devastating” impacts of criminal networks in the fishing industry. Fishermen, unable to work because stocks are so low, are being lured into gun-running and drug trafficking by international organised crime, the nations’ officials told an industry conference in Copenhagen this week. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 07:53
Far more must be invested in adapting to warming, says new global commission that aims to rebuild political will after US withdrawal from Paris agreement Far too little is being done to protect people from the heatwaves, storms and floods being supercharged by climate change, according to a high-level international commission. It aims to rebuild the political will to act that was damaged when US president, Donald Trump, rejected the global Paris agreement. The Global Commission on Adaptation is being led by Ban Ki-Moon, Bill Gates and Kristalina Georgieva, CEO of the World Bank. It involves 17 countries including China, India, South Africa, Indonesia, Canada and the UK. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 07:02
Almost 900,000 unsold meals are chucked out a day, according to food waste app Too Good To Go Almost 900,000 perfectly edible, freshly prepared meals end up in the bin in the UK every day, new figures reveal, because they haven’t been sold in time by restaurants and cafes. This means that more than 320m meals are thrown away by British food establishments every year – enough meals for everyone in the UK five times over, according to food waste app Too Good To Go. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 06:26
As a trained paramedic I understand emergency situations. In the face of catastrophic climate change, protest is a moral obligation I was arrested yesterday for blockading Cuadrilla’s fracking site at Preston New Road in Lancashire for more than 12 hours. It was the first day of fracking after a seven-year delay due to earthquakes, powerful local opposition and legal challenges. As a trained paramedic, I have a good appreciation of emergency situations. Climate change is the biggest emergency of them all. I join more than 350 people who have been arrested for disrupting Cuadrilla’s site in Lancashire over the last two years. People driven to take such action range from local councillors to faith leaders, students to grandparents. In the past fortnight, three people were sentenced to up to 16 months in prison for climbing on top of lorries that carried key fracking equipment. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 04:00
Opponents of the 160-mile Bayou Bridge pipeline, which will cross Native American land and 700 bodies of water, have chained themselves to machinery As the flat-bottom fishing boat speeds through waterways deep inside Louisiana’s Atchafalaya basin, the largest river swamp in the US, the landscape suddenly shifts from high banks of sediment and oil pipeline markers on either side to an open grove of cypress trees towering above the water. Flocks of white ibis appear, seemingly out of nowhere, to nest and hunt amid the moss-dripped, century-old wetland forest. “This is what the entire basin is supposed to look like,” explained Jody Meche, president of a local crawfishermen alliance and a lifelong resident with a thick Cajun accent. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 03:32
Big six energy firm drops fossil fuels for generation and say cheap green energy is the future Scottish Power has ditched fossil fuels for electricity generation and switched to 100% wind power, by selling off its last remaining gas power stations to Drax for more than £700m. Iberdrola, Scottish Power’s Spanish parent company, said the move was part of its strategy to tackle climate change and would free it up to invest in renewables and power grids in the UK. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 15:51
Ocean Leadership ~ I grew up in Panama City, Florida. It’s not only where I was born but where I fell in love with the ocean and where I learned to swim, to “pick” oysters, to fish, and to be wary of hurricanes threats such as Betsy in 1965 (seemingly named after my older sister). Without that early introduction to the salty bay water in our neighborhood and the beaches nearby, my life may well have followed a whole different trajectory. The widespread destruction Hurricane Michael bought to the region last week is a very personal reminder of the changes and increasing threats occurring in our coastal communities. As we deal with changes in climate that affect the ocean — rising sea levels, acidifying waters, migrating fish, bleaching corals — there must be a renewed importance placed on understanding and observing ocean conditions. I mentioned last week that during my recent trip to Florida, I met with the Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) Board of Directors, who are leading exemplary efforts to ensure coastal and open ocean data in the Gulf are collected, archived, and made readily available for analytic processes used in research and regulatory monitoring, just they are in emergency preparation and response. GCOOS is one of the 11 International Ocean Observing Systems (IOOS) Regional Associations, which are all now certified by NOAA as government-approved sources of environmental data. The importance of these entities in helping us understand ocean change, the speed at which it is occurring, and additional threats it will cause and interact with in the future cannot be understated. I salute and compliment all those at IOOS and other organizations working tirelessly to observe and understand the ocean, just as I do those who are selflessly working to rescue and provide relief to those affected by Hurricane Michael … Hurricane Florence, Typhoon Mangkhut, and the many other disasters that are impacting our changing ocean coasts around the globe. Bipartisan legislation reauthorizing IOOS has moved through the full Senate (S. 1425) and the House Natural Resources Committee (H.R. 237). I am optimistic that when Congress returns following the midterm elections, they will come together quickly to pass this important legislation, just like they did with the Save Our Seas (SOS) Act (S. 3508). The SOS Act, which was signed into law last week, takes the first step in addressing the marine debris crisis by reauthorizing NOAA’s Marine Debris Program and by fostering cooperation between the U.S and other countries. I’m pleased at the bipartisan cooperation that helped enact the SOS Act — and the work from countless groups in helping raise this issue with Congress, including a COL-hosted briefing on plastic pollution — and I hope the IOOS reauthorization can also make it across the finish line before this Congress reaches an end. Member Highlight Global Sea Levels Could Rise 8 Feet By 2100, More In NJ, Rutgers Study Says By the dawn of the next century, South Jersey’s barrier islands will pretty much disappear at high tide, based on data in a Rutgers University review of scientific literature. Global sea levels could rise by almost eight feet by 2100 and 50 feet by 2300, if emissions remain high and the physics of ice sheets work against us, according to the review. Read our most recent and past newsletters here: http://oceanleadership.org/newsletter-archive/ The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-15-2018 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.