Breaking Waves: Ocean News

08/16/2018 - 04:00
Officials plan to sell some of the land that once belonged to Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante, despite pledge not to US officials have announced plans to allow increased mining on land that once belonged to two national monuments Donald Trump shrank, and to sell off some of the land despite pledges not to do so. The two monuments, now significantly smaller in size, are both in Utah. The draft management plan for Grand Staircase-Escalante national monument includes a 98-page minerals report that outlines deposits of coal, oil and gas, tar sands and other minerals under the whole of the monument’s original 1.9m acres. Continue reading...
08/16/2018 - 02:41
Government and Senate crossbench combine to reject Greens and Labor motions to disallow controversial management plans A push by the Greens and Labor to attempt to force greater protection of fisheries in Australia’s marine parks has failed for the second time. The parties had vowed to reject controversial management plans for the parks proposed by the Turnbull government. But on Thursday the Senate crossbench combined with the Coalition to defeat disallowance motions on the basis that the parks would then be left with no plans in place and no limits on fishing. Continue reading...
08/16/2018 - 01:30
Peter Kimpton finds a bike that’s perfect for riding on the beach and explores the Glamorgan coast near Porthcawl Smooth tarmac to rough, potholed roads, gravel tracks to mountain paths, cyclists encounter good and bad surfaces, but rarely do we ride on sand. Most bikes would get stuck and seize up in seconds. Beaches may be free of traffic, but they are the last place you think of for a bike ride. Yet a fat-bike defies the laws of traction and discomfort, and allows you to explore thousands of miles of coast in a fraction of the time it would take to do so on foot. But where best to try it? Porthcawl, near Bridgend station on the coast between Cardiff and Swansea, is a surprisingly underused and beautiful beach. It’s the nearest lengthy surf beach to London and several other cities, lies near world-class mountain bike trails, is home to the rarest flower in Britain, and was a film location for Lawrence of Arabia. And for one weekend a year, it’s the surreal home to 35,000 Elvis devotees. Continue reading...
08/16/2018 - 01:30
Jorginho Guajajara’s killing is believed by members of his tribe to be the result of conflict with loggers in their Amazon territory Indigenous people in the Brazilian Amazon are mourning the murder of a community leader who campaigned to protect the forest from logging amid escalating violence in the region. Jorginho Guajajara, a cacique, or leader, of the Guajajara people, was found dead near a river in the city of Arame, Maranhão state, at the weekend. Continue reading...
08/16/2018 - 00:00
Anglo-Saxon capitalism’s drive to maximise profits in the short term won’t save the planet. Perhaps the Chinese model can? This summer’s heatwave has provided a glimpse of the future, and it is not a pretty one. On current trends, the years to come will see rising temperatures, droughts, a fight to feed a growing population, and a race against time to reduce dependency on fossil fuels. The struggle to combat climate change brings out the best and worst of capitalism. Decarbonisation of the economy requires alternatives for coal and cars that run on diesel, and that plays to capitalism’s strengths. Innovation is what capitalism is all about, and there has been staggeringly rapid progress in developing clean alternatives to coal, oil and gas. The cost of producing solar- and wind-powered electricity has collapsed. Great advances are also being made in battery technology, which is vital for the new generation of electricity-powered vehicles. Humans are endlessly creative. In the end, they will crack climate change. Continue reading...
08/16/2018 - 00:00
Cancer-linked herbicide, sold as Roundup by Monsanto, present in 45 products including granola, snack bars and Cheerios Significant levels of the weedkilling chemical glyphosate have been found in an array of popular breakfast cereals, oats and snack bars marketed to US children, a new study has found. Tests revealed glyphosate, the active ingredient in the popular weedkiller brand Roundup, present in all but two of the 45 oat-derived products that were sampled by the Environmental Working Group, a public health organization. Continue reading...
08/15/2018 - 22:02
NSW oysters are shrinking and fewer in number, and academics fear the cause is climate change The famous Sydney rock oyster is shrinking as oceans become more acidic, new research has found. In news that will rock seafood lovers, a study released overnight by academics in the UK found oysters in New South Wales have become smaller and fewer in number because of coastal acidification. Continue reading...
08/15/2018 - 19:02
Ability of bumblebees to reproduce, and rate at which colonies grow, compromised by new sulfoximine-based insecticides A new class of pesticides positioned to replace neonicotinoids may be just as harmful to crop-pollinating bees, researchers have warned. In experiments, the ability of bumblebees to reproduce, and the rate at which their colonies grow, were both compromised by the new sulfoximine-based insecticides, they reported in the journal Nature. Continue reading...
08/15/2018 - 17:45
Pauline Hanson wants five-year ban and a plebiscite on Muslim immigration to Australia 8.25am BST On that note, we will also adjourn until Monday. This first week back went for eternities. Whole civilisations rose and fell while we were locked in this building. I never thought I would be so happy to return to talking energy policy deadlocks. 8.12am BST From Tony Burke’s office: The Australian Parliament has just locked in the largest removal of area under conservation in history. Continue reading...
08/15/2018 - 14:51
Between 1982 and 2016, the number of ‘marine heatwaves’ doubled, and likely will become more common and intense as the planet warms, study finds Even the oceans are breaking temperature records in this summer of heatwaves. Off the California coast near San Diego, scientists in early August recorded all-time high seawater temperatures since daily measurements began in 1916. “Just like we have heatwaves on land, we also have heatwaves in the ocean,” said Art Miller of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Continue reading...