Breaking Waves: Ocean News

06/18/2018 - 09:26
Changes in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study has revealed.
06/18/2018 - 09:25
Tracking data from two great white sharks reveals that they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies, suggesting that's where they like to feed.
06/18/2018 - 09:20
Ocean Leadership ~ Blacktip sharks usually travel in the tens of thousands from North Carolina to Florida. But thanks to climate change, more are staying put. (From National Geographic / By Eric Niiler ) — The annual migration of blacktip sharks from southern Florida to North Carolina has begun—and researchers who track this amazing ritual say there are seeing only about one-third the usual number. The sharks—all male—swim south during the coldest months of the year and head north when spring arrives to mate with females. But for the past two years, many sharks are staying north, thanks to the East Coast’s warming waters. That could be a problem. These traveling sharks keep Florida’s coastal ecosystem healthy by weeding out weak and sick fish, and thereby helping to preserve coral reefs and seagrasses. Stephen Kajiura, a marine biologist at Florida Atlantic University, has been tracking blacktips for 15 years, climbing into a single-engine Cessna 172 and flying low over Florida’s crystal-clear waters with a camera poking out the window. He and his crew then jump in a boat to tag some sharks with a small acoustic device, or a longer-lasting satellite receiver. In past years, they’ve counted as many as 15,000 sharks in a single group. But not this season. (See our favorite shark videos of all time.) “This year has been strange,” Kajiura says. “Last year was unusually warm all winter: The water temperatures never got below 73.4 Fahrenheit. This year, the temperatures have risen dramatically to 78.8 Fahrenheit. It’s now even hotter than this time last year.” HEADING NORTH The underwater heatwave is the result of seasonal variability—just like there are cool summers and warm winters on land. But over time, Kajiura believes this migrant shark population will permanently shift northward in response to long-term rising ocean temperatures, which are linked to global climate change. Many of these changes are already underway. In fact, the waters off the northeastern U.S. have warmed faster than more than 99 percent of the world’s oceans in the past decade, according to Vince Saba, a marine biologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center. “We are seeing a northern shift in most of our fish stocks: winter flounder, summer flounder, herring, and mackerel,” Saba said. “Some of those species are… Read the full article here: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/animals-sharks-oceans-global-warming/ The post Member Highlight: More Sharks Ditching Annual Migration As Ocean Warms appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
06/18/2018 - 05:00
Short answer: maybe There’s recently been a spate of sea level rise denial in the conservative media, but in reality, sea level rise is accelerating and melting ice is playing an increasingly large role. In the first half of the 20th Century, average global sea level rose by about 1.4 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Since 1993, that rate has more than doubled to 3.2 mm/yr. And since 2012, it’s jumped to 4.5 mm/yr. Continue reading...
06/18/2018 - 01:26
Government directive means trustees will be able to push harder for green investments Managers of the £1.5tn invested in Britain’sworkplace pension schemes are to be given new powers to dump shares in oil, gas and coal companies in favour of long-term investment in green and “social impact” opportunities. Government proposals published on Monday are designed to give pension fund trustees more confidence to divest from environmentally damaging fossil fuels and put their cash in green alternatives if it meets their members’ wishes. Until now many pension trustees have been hamstrung by fiduciary duties that they feel requires them to seek the best returns irrespective of the threat of climate change. Continue reading...
06/18/2018 - 00:00
Climate change study predicts ‘staggering impact’ of swelling oceans on coastal communities within next 30 years Sea level rise driven by climate change is set to pose an existential crisis to many US coastal communities, with new research finding that as many as 311,000 homes face being flooded every two weeks within the next 30 years. The swelling oceans are forecast repeatedly to soak coastal residences collectively worth $120bn by 2045 if greenhouse gas emissions are not severely curtailed, experts warn. This will potentially inflict a huge financial and emotional toll on the half a million Americans who live in the properties at risk of having their basements, backyards, garages or living rooms inundated every other week. Continue reading...
06/18/2018 - 00:00
Retailer offers incentive to send back worn and unwanted items instead of binning them John Lewis is to buy back worn and unwanted clothing from its customers – including underwear and old socks – in a UK industry first that aims to reduce the 300,000 tonnes of fashion waste going into landfill each year. Customers can arrange through an app to have any unwanted clothing that they bought from John Lewis collected from their home, and they will be paid for each item regardless of its condition. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 23:30
Chanonry Point, Moray Firth: These cetaceans kill their porpoise cousins. Do they see them as competition for food? Or are they just killing for sport? There are occasions when nature shatters our cosy assumptions. Last week we were watching the bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) on the Moray Firth, much loved by tourists because they come so close to shore. They flip and leap, roll and dive, singly or in pods of a dozen or more, only a few yards from camera-clicking visitors thronging the shingle spit. The dolphins gather in the Chanonry narrows to feast on salmon migrating upstream to spawn. We often see salmon being flung high in the air and swallowed whole. A feeding spectacle. We know dolphins eat fish and we are comfortable with it. But what we witnessed in front of our lenses that day spun us into shock. Forget film-star Flipper, forget frolicking Fungie in Dingle Bay, forget chummy Sebastian in Disney’s Shark Tale – these Moray Firth dolphins are killers. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 18:01
Sir David Attenborough to tour new premises that showcase the extinct moa bird’s feathers When Sir David Attenborough opens the University of Cambridge’s zoology museum this week, the proud curators will show him their fabulous discovery. It’s fair to say the casual visitor might wonder why they are so excited by the scruffy frame containing a few cobwebby grey-brown wisps, discovered during a £4.1m redevelopment of the museum. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 13:00
The NT government has lifted its fracking moratorium despite fierce opposition, reflecting the war of attrition being waged by gas companies • An unconventional gas boom: the rise of CSG in Australia When the Northern Territory government announced a moratorium on fracking in 2016, it was a victory for those fighting the expansion of the unconventional gas industry. That elation was replaced with shock and disappointment in April, when the chief minister, Michael Gunner, said the practice could resume following a 15-month scientific inquiry. Continue reading...