Breaking Waves: Ocean News

01/16/2019 - 01:01
Quorn launches ‘fishless fillets’ made with protein derived from fungus Fish and chips is the latest British favourite to get a vegan makeover, with Quorn launching both battered and breaded “fishless fillets”. The fillets will be made using protein derived from a fungus and the company promises to replicate the texture and flakiness of real fish. The launch follows the success of the Greggs vegan sausage roll, which has been selling out across the country. Continue reading...
01/16/2019 - 01:00
Experts say the administration is blatantly dismantling proven programs, and the consequences could be dire Donald Trump’s administration is cutting programs scientists say are proven to protect Americans, from pollution safeguards to teen pregnancy prevention and healthier school lunches, with effects that could last for years. Experts who have worked in the federal government under Republicans and Democrats say both have sometimes put politics ahead of science but none have done so as blatantly as Trump. And they warn the consequences could continue long into the future. Continue reading...
01/16/2019 - 01:00
Administration’s alternative to clean power plan would let emissions ‘rebound’ via coal-fired power plants, researchers find The Trump administration’s replacement for the linchpin Obama-era plan to combat climate change would increase greenhouse gas emissions in much of the US more than doing nothing at all, according to new research. Planet-warming emissions would “rebound” under the Trump policy, researchers found, as it delays the retirement of coal-fired power plants. Carbon dioxide emissions would be 8.7% higher in 18 states and Washington DC by 2030, compared with having no policy at all. Continue reading...
01/15/2019 - 17:10
Ocean Leadership ~ As Snow Forces Shutdown Of Federal Government Already Mostly Shutdown, The Ocean And Atmosphere Keep Churning This weekend, as D.C settled in for what turned out to be its ninth-largest January snowfall in history, a much more dubious record was also reached – the current government shutdown became the longest in history. While it’s easy to see the immediate impacts of the shutdown in some cases, including missed paychecks for federal employees and lost income for many contractors, postponed and halted food inspections, staffing shortages at airports, and more, some of these effects may not be felt for months to come. For example, the National Science Foundation should be reviewing research proposals right now, but the shutdown has pushed review dates back months. This doesn’t mean there’s simply a delay in the research that ultimately receives grants – entire field seasons can be missed, universities may not be able to accept graduate students, and long-term research can be disrupted or even discontinued. Or take the hundreds of employees at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) who were set to attend last week’s American Meteorological Society’s Annual Meeting but couldn’t, missing out on a critical opportunity to share knowledge across sectors and with international counterparts (and competitors) to strengthen our nation’s weather — and ocean— enterprise. And while many employees at NOAA’s National Weather Service are continuing their “mission-essential functions,” vital updates to existing weather and ocean models are on hold, and the release of a new, badly-needed global atmospheric model set for February will surely be delayed. Emergency managers may also miss out on crucial training to prepare them (and therefore everyone living in coastal communities) for hurricane season. It’s clear that the longer this government shutdown continues, the more we risk irrevocable, harmful impacts— some of which we may not see for months or even years to come. While the ocean churns continuously and oft times cataclysmically, in the end it achieves perpetual balance that contorts to the laws of physics and nature. I hope that as our government goes through its own agitated, calamitous period, our lawmakers might reflect on the ocean for but a brief moment and then seek and achieve a similar balance … soon. Member Highlight International Research Team To Study Effects Of Ocean Acidification On Iron Availability To Phytoplankton In North Pacific The effect of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in the eastern North Pacific is the focus of a three-year, more than $954,000 National Science Foundation collaborative research grant to the University of Maine, University of Washington and University of South Florida. The international collaboration also will feature educational outreach for the public, with Maine K–12 students and their teachers engaged in learning opportunities during and after the research cruise. Read our most recent and past newsletters here: http://oceanleadership.org/newsletter-archive/ The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 01-14-2018 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 16:52
Ocean Leadership ~ The Alaska Marine Science Symposium is partnering with the American Geophysical Union and their Sharing Science Program to deliver a 1.5 day science communication & policy training workshop. Open to all scientists, science communicators, media, and other audiences. One-on-one consultation sessions will be available Monday morning for critique and evaluation of materials, products, and project ideas. More info and registration here: http://tinyurl.com/y98pxrcg The post Science Communication & Policy Workshop At AMSS 2019 (Jan. 18) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 16:41
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: Architect of the Capitol) From: Ocean News Weekly/ By: Ocean Leadership Staff  What Passed December was busy for ocean science legislation as it was the last month before the start of a new Congress. All bills not signed into law by the end of the 115th Congress must be reintroduced and start the legislative process anew if they want to be considered in the 116th Congress. The Commercial Engagement Through Ocean Technology (CENOTE) Act of 2018 (S. 2511; P.L. 115-394), signed into law Dec. 21, encourages partnerships between academia, the private sector, and the government in the realm of ocean observation. CENOTE, which Consortium for Ocean Leadership strongly supports, directs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to coordinate development of unmanned maritime systems through partnerships with the Navy, universities, and private industry and make data readily available through the Integrated Ocean Observing System. The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 (S. 140; P.L. 115-282) was signed into law at the beginning of the month, authorizing the U.S. Coast Guard and the Federal Maritime Commission through fiscal year (FY) 2019, reauthorizing NOAA’s hydrographic services program through FY 2023, and modifying the regulation of vessel incidental discharge and ballast water. In fisheries-related bills, the Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management (Modern Fish) Act (S. 1520: P.L. 115-405) passed both chambers and was signed into law. This bill updates policies in mixed-use fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico to expand recreational fishing opportunities and encourages NOAA to collaborate with recreational anglers to improve its recreational fishing data collection. The House passed the Offshore Wind for Territories Act (H.R. 6665), which would amend federal law to authorize offshore wind energy development in the Exclusive Economic Zone adjacent to all five U.S. territories. What’s New Two bills aimed at raising U.S. presence in the Arctic were introduced in December. The Arctic Policy Act (APA) of 2018 (S. 3739) would amend the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 to try and increase local and indigenous voices in federal science and policy by modifying the membership of the Arctic Research Commission. The Shipping and Environmental Arctic Leadership (SEAL) Act (S. 3740) establishes a congressionally-charted seaway development corporation in the Arctic to collect voluntary maritime shipping fees from vessels utilizing the region – funding resources and infrastructure necessary to ensure safety, security, and management of the Arctic. What’s Next A partial government shutdown began on December 21, 2018, when Congress failed to pass FY 2019 appropriations bills or a continuing resolution (CR) due to controversial funding for the Department of Homeland Security. This impacts important science agencies such as NOAA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Until Congress passes another continuing resolution (CR) or FY 2019 appropriations bills, unfunded agencies will remain closed. Related coverage from the Consortium for Ocean Leadership Buoying Our Nation’s Economy: The Role Of Ocean Data In Supporting The Blue Economy Unmanned Maritime Systems Benefit From New Legislation October And November’s Congressional Wrap Up September’s Congressional Wrap Up August’s Congressional Wrap Up Jon White – From the President’s Office: 05-14-2018 Want to receive articles like this straight to your inbox? Sign up for our newsletter! The post December’s Congressional Wrap Up appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 16:27
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: NOAA MESA Project/ Wikimedia Commons) The effect of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in the eastern North Pacific is the focus of a three-year, more than $954,000 National Science Foundation collaborative research grant to the University of Maine, University of Washington and University of South Florida. (From University of Maine/ By Margaret Nagle ) — UMaine School of Marine Sciences professor Mark Wells will lead the project, in collaboration with Charles Trick from Western University and Kristen Buck from the University of South Florida. Joining them will be Shigenobu Takeda of the University of Nagasaki, and graduate and undergraduate students from the four universities. The international collaboration also will feature educational outreach for the public, with Maine K–12 students and their teachers engaged in learning opportunities during and after the research cruise. Ocean acidification is caused by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. Carbon dioxide dissolves from the atmosphere into the surface ocean and reacts with seawater to form acid, causing lower seawater pH. This acidification already can be measured, but it will be greatly magnified by the end of the century. One of the outcomes from ocean acidification will be changes in the availability of iron to marine phytoplankton, the grasses of the sea that support the marine food web and account for more than half the biomass of the oceans. Like humans, phytoplankton require iron to grow, but much of the iron dissolved in seawater is bound with organic molecules in ways that limit the ability of phytoplankton to access it. Much of the biological production in the global ocean is limited by this iron availability, and it is uncertain whether ocean acidification will lead to decreases in… Read the full article here: https://umaine.edu/news/blog/2019/01/08/international-research-team-to-study-effects-of-ocean-acidification-on-iron-availability-to-phytoplankton-in-north-pacific/ The post Member Highlight: International Research Team To Study Effects Of Ocean Acidification On Iron Availability To Phytoplankton In North Pacific appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 16:07
Ocean Leadership ~ The Department of Defense (DoD), through the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP), supports the demonstration of technologies that address priority DoD environmental and installation energy requirements. The goal of ESTCP is to promote the transfer of innovative technologies through demonstrations that collect the data needed for regulatory and DoD end-user acceptance. Projects conduct formal demonstrations at DoD facilities and sites in operational settings to document and validate improved performance and cost savings. ESTCP is seeking proposals for demonstrations of innovative environmental and installation energy technologies as candidates for funding beginning in FY 2020. The solicitation requests pre-proposals via Calls for Proposals to Federal organizations and via a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for Private Sector organizations. Pre-proposals are due March 7, 2019 by 2 p.m. ET. Detailed instructions are on the ESTCP website under Funding Opportunities. DoD organizations (Service and Defense Agencies) may submit pre-proposals for demonstrations of innovative technologies in the following topic areas: Environmental Restoration Munitions Response Underwater Resource Conservation and Resiliency Weapons Systems and Platforms Energy Efficiency Technology Demonstrations Integrated with Utility Energy Services Contracts (UESC) Microgrid Development for Military Installations Effective Use of Utility Meter Data to Improve Facility Energy Investments Innovative Tools that Reduce the Time and Cost Required to Obtain and Maintain Authority to Operate for Facility Energy and Water Control Systems and Connected Technology Innovative Technology Transfer Approaches The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) and Call for Proposals (CFP) for Federal Organizations Outside DoD are seeking pre-proposals for technologies in the following topic areas: Innovative Technology Transfer Approaches Management of Contaminated Groundwater Long Term Management of Contaminated Aquatic Sediments Detection, Classification, and Remediation of Military Munitions in Underwater Environments Infrastructure Resiliency Arctic Engineering Design Tool Advanced Brown Tree Snake Control Tools Energy Efficiency Technology Demonstrations Integrated with Utility Energy Services Contracts (UESC) Microgrid Development for Military Installations Effective Use of Utility Meter Data to Improve Facility Energy Investments Innovative Tools that Reduce the Time and Cost Required to Obtain and Maintain Authority to Operate for Facility Energy and Water Control Systems and Connected Technology WEBINAR – JANUARY 15: ESTCP Director Dr. Herb Nelson and Deputy Director Dr. Andrea Leeson will conduct an online seminar “ESTCP Funding Opportunities” on January 15, 2019, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. This briefing will offer valuable information for those interested in new ESTCP funding opportunities. During the online seminar, participants may ask questions about the funding process, the current ESTCP solicitation, and the proposal submission process. Pre-registration for this webinar is required. If you have difficulty registering, please contact the ESTCP Support Office at serdp-estcp.webinars@noblis.org or by telephone at 571-372-6565. The post Funding Available For Environmental And Installation Energy Technology Demonstrations (Mar. 07) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 16:04
Ocean Leadership ~ The Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, School of Earth and Ocean Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa invites applications for three full-time, tenure-track assistant professor positions in the area of Ocean/Marine Engineering. The successful candidates are expected to teach graduate and undergraduate courses, mentor graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, develop and conduct extramurally funded research projects, publish research in peer reviewed journals and in other forms as appropriate, and participate in departmental, university and professional activities. Applicants should have (1) a PhD degree in Ocean/Marine Engineering or a closely related discipline received no later than January 31, 2019, (2) demonstrated ability as a teacher and student mentor, (3) demonstrated capability for high quality research, (4) excellent communication skills, and (5) experience in coastal engineering, offshore engineering, ocean resources engineering, underwater vehicles, or oceanographic instrumentation. Additionally, it is desirable for applicants to have established extramurally funded projects and have practical and/or professional experience and licensing. For complete job descriptions, go to https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/hawaiiedu and search for job numbers 0088488 (offshore ocean engineering), 0085926 (underwater robotics, autonomous surface and underwater vehicles, ocean instrumentation, or related topics), and 0085983 (general ocean engineering). Applications must be submitted electronically via email to (orejob@hawaii.edu) as a single PDF file that must include: (1) a detailed resume/CV; (2) external citation report (preferably via Web of Science); (3) teaching and research plans; (4) copies of three relevant publications; (5) transcripts (copies acceptable with application, official document upon hire); (6) names, addresses, and contact information including e-mail addresses of at least three professional references. Completed applications will be reviewed beginning January 31, 2019, open until filled. The Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa is a graduate department offering MS and PhD degrees with a strong commitment to teaching and mentoring graduate students, conducting extramurally funded research, and publishing scholarly materials. The ABET-accredited academic program includes coastal engineering, offshore engineering, ocean resources engineering, oceanographic instrumentation, and interdisciplinary studies. Additional information can be found at: http://www.ore.hawaii.edu/ The post Assistant Professor in Ocean/Marine Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa (Jan. 31) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/15/2019 - 14:08
Confectioner to phase out all non-recyclable or hard-to-recycle plastic from products The food and drink multinational Nestlé has stepped up its effort to reduce its use of plastics, rolling out plastic-free packaging across several products and pledging to phase out plastic Smarties tube tops. Nestlé has pledged to phase out all plastics that are not recyclable or are hard to recycle for all its products worldwide between 2020 and 2025. In the UK, its focus will be on recycling and increasing recycled PET content. Continue reading...