Breaking Waves: Ocean News

Frogs, foam and fuel: Solar energy converted to sugars
03/17/2010 - 10:00
In natural photosynthesis, plants take in solar energy and carbon dioxide and then convert it to oxygen and sugars. The oxygen is released to the air and the sugars are dispersed throughout the plant -- like that sweet corn we look for in the summer. Unfortunately, the allocation of light energy into products we use is not as efficient as we would like. Now engineering researchers are doing something about that.
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First parasitic nematodes reported in biofuel crops
03/16/2010 - 23:00
Researchers in Illinois have discovered widespread occurrence of plant-parasitic nematodes in the first reported nematode survey of Miscanthus and switchgrass plants used for biofuels.
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High levels of mercury found in Cataraqui River, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
03/16/2010 - 23:00
The Inner Harbour on the Cataraqui River in Kingston, Ont., has mercury levels in sediment more than two times the Canadian government's most severe effect limits, according to a new study.
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Synthetic Biology: Engineered Bacteria
03/16/2010 - 23:00
Researchers have devised a way to attach sugars to proteins using unique biological and chemical methods. This means that large quantities of different glycoproteins can be generated for various medical and biological studies.
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In search of key blue ingredient in ancient Egyptian pottery
03/16/2010 - 23:00
As one of the "generic geologists" on a dig called the Dakhleh Oasis Project, associate professor Jennifer Smith was asked to sample the alum from ancient mines and to determine whether it could be the source of the blue in the "blue painted pottery" found at sites dating from the New Kingdom. It was a small question but an intriguing one.
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Prior herbicide use -- not irrigation -- is critical to herbicide efficacy
03/16/2010 - 23:00
Crop and herbicide use history are more critical to herbicide efficacy and environmental safety than the timing and amount of irrigation water used, according to agricultural scientists.
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An organic approach to pest control: releasing super-sexed (but sterile) male insects
03/16/2010 - 23:00
An improved method for sustainable pest control using "super-sexed" but sterile male insects to copulate with female ones is being developed by agricultural researchers in Israel. The scientists thus hope to offer yet another efficient and promising avenue for supplying produce to the market by eliminating pests without damage to the environment.
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Bees see super color at super speed
03/16/2010 - 23:00
Bees see the world almost five times faster than humans, according to new research.
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Sharks from deep waters of Cantabrian Sea are opportunist hunters
03/16/2010 - 23:00
A team of Spanish researchers has studied the diet of three species of sharks living in the deep waters in the area of El Cachucho, the first Protected Marine Area in Spain, which is located in the Cantabrian Sea off the coast of Asturias. These animals feed on the resources available in their environment, according to changes taking place in the ocean depths.
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Chemicals that eased one environmental problem may worsen another
03/16/2010 - 22:00
Chemicals that helped solve a global environmental crisis in the 1990s -- the hole in Earth's protective ozone layer -- may be making another problem -- acid rain -- worse, scientists are reporting. A new study analyzes the effect of chemicals that replaced the ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons once used in aerosol spray cans, air conditioners, refrigerators, and other products.
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