Breaking Waves: Ocean News

10/16/2018 - 10:31
Ministers of island states call for help in tackling organised crime in the fishing industry, which they say is harming both the environment and human rights Ministers from tiny island states including Palau, the Solomon Islands and Kiribati are calling for help over the “devastating” impacts of criminal networks in the fishing industry. Fishermen, unable to work because stocks are so low, are being lured into gun-running and drug trafficking by international organised crime, the nations’ officials told an industry conference in Copenhagen this week. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 07:53
Far more must be invested in adapting to warming, says new global commission that aims to rebuild political will after US withdrawal from Paris agreement Far too little is being done to protect people from the heatwaves, storms and floods being supercharged by climate change, according to a high-level international commission. It aims to rebuild the political will to act that was damaged when US president, Donald Trump, rejected the global Paris agreement. The Global Commission on Adaptation is being led by Ban Ki-Moon, Bill Gates and Kristalina Georgieva, CEO of the World Bank. It involves 17 countries including China, India, South Africa, Indonesia, Canada and the UK. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 07:02
Almost 900,000 unsold meals are chucked out a day, according to food waste app Too Good To Go Almost 900,000 perfectly edible, freshly prepared meals end up in the bin in the UK every day, new figures reveal, because they haven’t been sold in time by restaurants and cafes. This means that more than 320m meals are thrown away by British food establishments every year – enough meals for everyone in the UK five times over, according to food waste app Too Good To Go. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 06:26
As a trained paramedic I understand emergency situations. In the face of catastrophic climate change, protest is a moral obligation I was arrested yesterday for blockading Cuadrilla’s fracking site at Preston New Road in Lancashire for more than 12 hours. It was the first day of fracking after a seven-year delay due to earthquakes, powerful local opposition and legal challenges. As a trained paramedic, I have a good appreciation of emergency situations. Climate change is the biggest emergency of them all. I join more than 350 people who have been arrested for disrupting Cuadrilla’s site in Lancashire over the last two years. People driven to take such action range from local councillors to faith leaders, students to grandparents. In the past fortnight, three people were sentenced to up to 16 months in prison for climbing on top of lorries that carried key fracking equipment. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 04:00
Opponents of the 160-mile Bayou Bridge pipeline, which will cross Native American land and 700 bodies of water, have chained themselves to machinery As the flat-bottom fishing boat speeds through waterways deep inside Louisiana’s Atchafalaya basin, the largest river swamp in the US, the landscape suddenly shifts from high banks of sediment and oil pipeline markers on either side to an open grove of cypress trees towering above the water. Flocks of white ibis appear, seemingly out of nowhere, to nest and hunt amid the moss-dripped, century-old wetland forest. “This is what the entire basin is supposed to look like,” explained Jody Meche, president of a local crawfishermen alliance and a lifelong resident with a thick Cajun accent. Continue reading...
10/16/2018 - 03:32
Big six energy firm drops fossil fuels for generation and say cheap green energy is the future Scottish Power has ditched fossil fuels for electricity generation and switched to 100% wind power, by selling off its last remaining gas power stations to Drax for more than £700m. Iberdrola, Scottish Power’s Spanish parent company, said the move was part of its strategy to tackle climate change and would free it up to invest in renewables and power grids in the UK. Continue reading...
World OCean Radio Has Gone Global
08/20/2014 - 08:40
Aug. 7, 2014 | This is a big week for the World Ocean Observatory. First, it is a major milestone for World Ocean Radio: we broadcast our 300th audio episode since World Ocean Radio first aired in 2009. And second, this week we are announcing the launch of an expansion of World Ocean Radio into four additional languages. A selection of broadcasts (see www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global) are now available in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Swahili, translated from our audio archive and representing an extraordinary opportunity to extend our communication efforts beyond English and into major geographical areas that have been outside our broadcast capacity. We now have the opportunity to offer our radio feature to outlets in France, Spain, Portugal, all the nations in Central and South America, and in certain regions of Africa. World Ocean Radio brings discussion of the ocean and its impact on all aspects of human survival to a global audience. Provided at no cost, this weekly service is intended to provide responsible information and advocacy toward greater understanding of the meaning of the ocean for its rapidly degrading state, the impact on our lives, and a variety of specific actions that can be taken-–both by governments and individuals-–to mitigate the problems, modify behaviors, evolve policies, implement change, broaden public awareness, and build political will. We are extremely proud of this accomplishment and are gratified by the enthusiastic and positive response we get from listeners all over the world. Learn more at http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/about-world-ocean-radio or by visiting http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global Connect with our July newsletter at http://eepurl.com/0p1fH. As always, thank you! ____________________________________________________ Here are five ways to help World Ocean Radio to engage a larger, global audience: 1. Share World Ocean Radio Forward each week's broadcast to everyone you think might be an ally. 2. Link to World Ocean Radio on your organizations' website. Consider how your organization might help by linking to World Ocean Radio on its web page, sharing it among fellow workers, incorporating it into the work it does, and promoting it to the population you serve. 3. Share World Ocean Radio with faculty & students If you are an educational institution, a museum, aquarium, or environmental program, share World Ocean Radio with your faculty and students, incorporate it into curriculum, use it to stimulate and focus discussions, promote it as a membership or community service, share it formally and informally as an educational tool, even use it as a marketing opportunity to recruit new audience with ocean interest to your programs. 4. Explore how these broadcasts might promote mutual goals Identify other partners or associations with which you work and explore ways in which these broadcasts might promote mutual goals and collective objectives by sharing with their constituents to demonstrate professional and collective interest. 5. Look for broadcast outlets in your area, especially if you are a Spanish-, French-, Portuguese-, or Swahili-speaking listener Find local, regional, or national networks, college, community, or environmental radio stations. Recruit them to the ocean cause, linking your organization to World Ocean Radio and growing your outreach and civic engagement. World Ocean Radio can speak loudly and widely for us all. Become its champion; commit to this simple action; make a connection; help us spread a message for the ocean that will be amplified and echoed across the sea that connects us all.
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No Refuge: Tons of Trash Cover Remote Alaskan Shores
07/02/2013 - 09:11
A great article by Carl Safina about the tsunami debris (Japan, 2011) washing up on the remotest shores of the Alaskan wilderness. http://ow.ly/mAk4E
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UN Secretary Ban Ki-moon to Launch "Oceans Compact"
08/15/2012 - 11:13
UN Secretary-General to Launch Oceans Compact at Yeosu International Conference NEW YORK, 10 August ― United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will launch the Oceans Compact—an initiative to strengthen United Nations system-wide coherence to deliver on its oceans-related mandates--on Sunday, 12 August, in Yeosu, Republic of Korea. The new Compact, “Healthy Oceans for Prosperity—An Initiative of the Secretary-General,” aims to bring together all parts of the UN system to improve the coordination and effectiveness of the work of the UN on oceans. Mr. Ban will launch the initiative at the Yeosu International Conference to commemorate the 30th Anniversary of the Opening for Signature of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. “The world’s oceans are key to sustaining life on the planet,” the Secretary-General says in the Compact, “constituting a conduit for ninety per cent of the world trade, and for connecting people, markets and livelihoods.”  But he adds that humans have put the oceans under risk of irreversible damage by overfishing, climate change and ocean acidification, increasing pollution, unsustainable coastal area development, and unwanted impacts from resource extraction, resulting in loss of biodiversity, decreased abundance of species, damage to habitats and loss of ecological functions. The Oceans Compact aims to mobilize and enhance the UN system´s capacity to support actions by Governments, and promote the engagement of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, scientists, the private sector and industry to tackle challenges in protecting and restoring the health and productivity of the oceans for the benefit of present and future generations. The Compact sets out a strategic vision for the UN system on oceans, consistent with the Rio+20 outcome document, “The Future We Want,” in which countries agreed on a range of measures to be taken to protect the oceans and promote sustainable development. The Oceans Compact also supports the implementation of existing relevant instruments, in particular the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. With the goal of achieving “Healthy Oceans for Prosperity”, the Compact establishes three objectives: protecting people and improving the health of the oceans; protecting, recovering and sustaining the oceans’ environment and natural resources; and strengthening ocean knowledge and the management of oceans. In addition to providing a platform for all stakeholders to collaborate and accelerate progress toward promoting healthy oceans, the Compact will be underpinned by pragmatic short-, medium- and long-term strategies to increase coordination and cooperation at the national, regional and global levels as well as within the United Nations system. The intent is to address the cumulative impacts of sectoral activities on the marine environment, including through implementing ecosystem and precautionary approaches. In the Compact, the Secretary-General proposes the creation of an Oceans Advisory Group, composed of Executive Heads of involved UN system organizations, high-level policy-makers, scientists, leading ocean experts, private sector representatives, representatives of non-governmental organizations and civil society organizations. The Advisory Group would also advise on strategies for mobilizing resources needed for the implementation of the Oceans Compact Action Plan. Background The launch of the Oceans Compact follows the announcement by the Secretary-General earlier this year of his Five-Year Action Agenda, which includes oceans as a main category. In that context, he decided to give strong emphasis to the importance of oceans and their role in sustainable development by putting forward the idea of an Oceans Compact that would commit the wide United Nations System to furthering “healthy oceans for prosperity.” The timing of this initiative is especially significant as 2012 marks the 30th anniversary of the opening for signature of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which sets out the legal framework within which all activities in the oceans and seas must be carried out.  The Convention is considered of strategic importance as the basis for national, regional and global action and cooperation in the marine sector and as an important contribution to the maintenance of peace, justice and progress for all peoples of the world.   The Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (DOALOS) in the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs (OLA) has been organizing a series of events at UN Headquarters to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention, including a panel discussion held on World Oceans Day (8 June 2012 - see: www.un.org/Depts/los/reference_files/worldoceansday.htm) and the production of a video entitled "UNCLOS at 30" (available at www.un.org/Depts/los/index.htm). The commemoration will continue at the General Assembly’s sixty-seventh session, with two days of high-level meetings, on 10 and 11 December 2012, and the publication of a pamphlet and a commemorative booklet on UNCLOS. For further information, please contact Dan Shepard, UN Department of Public Information, 1 212-963-9495, email shepard@un.org  
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"Bloody Bay Wall" World Premiere
03/19/2012 - 19:03
Our friend and colleague David Conover of Compass Light Productions will debut two short films at this year's Environmental Film Festival in Washington A discussion with filmmaker David Conover and marine scientist Nancy Knowlton will follow the screening on Sunday, March 25th. "Exploring Bloody Bay Wall" was co-produced by World Ocean Observatory for inclusion in our second module, Ocean Biodiversity, for the Subscription Services.
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