Breaking Waves: Ocean News

04/30/2016 - 01:30
Robert Macfarlane, Helen Macdonald, Kathleen Jamie and other contemporary writers choose the books that made them fall in love with the natural world TH White’s tragic and beautiful memoir of his attempts to train a young goshawk in 1936 is a story that works in counterpoint to my own in H Is for Hawk, and it still tugs at my heart. It wasn’t just a literary inspiration. Deep down it fuelled my own compulsion to train a goshawk after my father’s sudden death. When I read it as a child I understood that it was about a man running to a hawk to escape from something. Back then I didn’t know anything about White’s violent, loveless childhood, nor his struggles with his sexuality. I didn’t know why he was running. But I knew he was hurting. And when my father died and I was hurting too, some part of me remembered that a goshawk was something to run away to. Continue reading...
04/30/2016 - 01:30
The UK has hundreds of islands, hills and rivers and a coastline almost 20,000 miles long, inspiring a passion deep within us. Plus: top five wild hotspots Recently, I climbed Maol Chean-dearg, a mountain in the far north-west of Scotland. Down in the glens, it was not far above freezing, and the cold air pooled as mist. But up on the summits the sun blazed, and the temperature touched 15C. The result was one of the most dazzling cloud inversions I have seen in 30 years. In the high corries of the peak, I climbed out of the mist and into clearness. To the west, jagging from a glowing sea of cloud, were the Black Cuillin of Skye and the Clisham on the Outer Hebrides. Nearby were the graceful Torridon tops: Beinn Alligin, whose Gaelic name means the jewelled hill, and Liathach, the grey one. Far to the east rose the white domes of the Cairngorms. I had a sight-span of almost 200 miles, across mountain, glen, sea and loch. There was nowhere I would rather have been than there. Continue reading...
04/30/2016 - 01:00
I’ll admit it, I didn’t read the small print. So I almost paid the price when a £26 offer was cut by more than two-thirds I’m an idiot, I don’t mind admitting it. In a fit of stupidity, and only seeing pounds signs, I was lured in by flashy marketing and failed to read the small print when looking to make some extra cash. I sent off an old mobile phone to a gadget recycling company without checking its credentials or terms of business – and it nearly cost me dear. RapidRecycle.co.uk, part of Goodbye Gadgets, quoted me £26.75 for my old Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini. It was in full working order with only one or two scratches and chips. There were three options when describing it: new, working and faulty. I picked working. “Super prices! We pay what we quote,” the website boasts. “Don’t trust other recyclers with their overinflated prices. Rapid Recycle will only give you the best!” Continue reading...
04/29/2016 - 23:30
Crewe Green, Cheshire Creative writing students take a walk in the natural world in search of material for poetry The sky is as lovely as an illustration in a children’s picture book, pale blue with a big sun, yellow as a buttercup. There is a cobweb-faint breeze. We are approaching the copse, a group of creative writing students and I, a walk in the natural world, material for poetry. The air is alive with spring sounds: bees buzzing, birds singing, a gardener cutting the lawn near the halls of residence. Continue reading...
04/29/2016 - 17:11
Former US Democratic vice-president says agency’s decision will deeply affect the source of valuable research for the entire world Al Gore has said the decision by Australia’s science agency CSIRO to cut climate research should be “re-evaluated at the highest level”, since they limit a source of critical information for the entire world as it attempts to solve the challenges posed by climate change. The former US Democratic vice-president also praised the government’s support for renewable energy and the Labor party’s recent climate change policy announcement. Continue reading...
04/29/2016 - 17:08
Leading environmental activist says cheaper renewable energy provides an opportunity to create a sustainable world economy – but we must do more Al Gore, former US vice-president, Nobel laureate and chairman of the Climate Reality Project, has led the global discussion about climate change for many years. His multi-award-winning film An Inconvenient Truth (2006) has been widely credited with changing the way world leaders and citizens think about the issue. Don Henry is public policy fellow in environmentalism at the University of Melbourne and is a former director of the Australian Conservation Foundation. He is a long-term collaborator with Gore. Their conversation was recorded for the Griffith Review. Related: Al Gore attacks CSIRO's climate cuts and praises Labor's proposals Continue reading...
04/29/2016 - 16:42
Bipartisanship on climate policy would bring ‘real economic benefits’, former Reserve Bank board member Warwick Mckibbon says The investor uncertainty caused by a continuing climate policy war would push power prices up by more than the policies proposed by either the government or Labor, according to a leading modeller. Related: Why Coalition climate scare campaign is not credible and makes no sense Continue reading...
04/29/2016 - 15:05
Ocean Leadership ~ http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=222a27da663bc7a6c129815e5&id=fb3328356f The post ONW: Week of April 25, 2016 – Number 315 – Available Now! appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
04/29/2016 - 13:52
Ocean Leadership ~ After amazing competition and sportsmanship, the nineteenth annual National Ocean Sciences Bowl is over.  It was a nail biting, tear-inducing (literally) final match that was tied at the halfway point. California’s Albany High School pulled ahead for the win over Wisconsin’s Marshfield High School for their first ever NOSB Finals win!  Two other big winners for the weekend – Lexington High School (Massachusetts) won the Science Experts Briefing, a mock congressional hearing, and York High School (Maine) took home the James D. Watkins Sportsmanship Award. Congratulations to the winners, to all of our tough competitors, and the Ocean Leadership staff for another amazingly successful NOSB!  I’d also like to send a huge thank you to all of our volunteers, judges, and sponsors – we could not have done this without you. Back in DC, I switched gears and was part of the “Technology Solutions in an Opening Arctic” congressional briefing hosted by the Marine Technology Society, House Oceans Caucus, and Congressional Arctic Working Group. The continuing loss of overall sea ice in the Arctic is already producing challenges and opportunities.  My presentation, and the theme I carried throughout the panel discussion is that the Arctic nations and other world leaders must use good ocean science and technology (much of which comes from our members) to inform decisions regarding economic and other opportunities in the changing Arctic.  If we do so, I am convinced that we can ensure an Arctic “opening” that remains peaceful and pristine, while the economy becomes more prosperous and productive. Yesterday I had the opportunity to address the esteemed NOAA Science Advisory Board, which was attended by all of the NOAA senior staff and line office directors.  I used the NOSB results as a springboard to stress that we have a unique opportunity in history.  I believe our nation (and the world) is waking up to the critical importance that ocean, atmospheric, and climate science (among others) play in the future of our planet and its human population.  Thus, we must gather, harmonize, and project the voices of all earth science communities, of all ages and backgrounds, today to develop solutions and inform the critical decisions in front of us.  -JonRADM Jonathan W. White, USN (ret.)President and CEOConsortium for Ocean Leadership Member Highlight Plastics Below The Ocean Surface A 2015 paper published in Science estimates that anywhere from 4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of plastic were dumped into the ocean in 2010 alone. New research by University of Delaware physical oceanographer Tobias Kukulka provides evidence that the amount of plastic in the marine environment may be greater than previously thought. The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 4-29-2016 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
04/29/2016 - 13:43
US Interior Secretary Sally Jewell has painted a stark picture of communities displaced by rising Arctic temperatures that are ‘washing away’ towns The Obama administration has warned the US will need to deal with a wave of “climate refugees” as the Arctic continues to warm, joining with the Canadian government to express alarm over how climate change is affecting indigenous communities. Sally Jewell, US secretary of the interior, painted a stark picture of communities relocating and lives disrupted in her first official visit to Canada. The Arctic, which is warming at twice the rate of the global average, has just recorded its lowest recorded peak ice extent after what’s been called a “warm, crazy winter”. Continue reading...