Breaking Waves: Ocean News

08/14/2018 - 17:37
One Nation leader says senators who shook Anning’s hand were ‘gutless’ as crossbencher doubles down on controversial maiden speech. All the days events, live Fraser Anning calls for ‘final solution’ on immigration Exclusive: Centrelink trial bypasses safeguard for mentally ill 1.41am BST Derryn Hinch: The Justice Party totally supports all the comments by Senator Wong, Senator Cormann and Senator Di Natale. I just want to place on record an action I took last night in this August chamber that I sincerely regret. Out of respect for this establishment I sat through the whole 30 minute diatribe, categorised as a first speech, from Senator Fraser Anning. I did not walk out, as one senator did during my first speech. At the time, I criticise the Greens for ostentatiously walking out on camera during Senator Hanson’s first speech. I believe in free speech, especially in these houses of parliament, but there are limits. That is why I voted in favour of the censure motion yesterday—of Senate Leyonhjelm, who made disgusting personal comments about Senator Hanson-Young. 1.41am BST Richard Di Natale: The Greens will absolutely be supporting this motion. We are a proud nation of immigrants. The things that bring us together are far more important and far more significant than the things that divide us. We should be very proud of the multicultural story here in Australia. Multiculturalism is often framed in language around people from multicultural communities needing to accept Australian values, but there’s something much deeper going on. What that means is that people who come here from right around the world actually enrich our values. They make us better. They make us think more deeply about our national character. They help us to reflect on those things which we can learn from those communities that come here, make a contribution and make Australia a better place. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 13:00
Coal-fired power subsidies mean the projections relied on by Coalition are not credible, study says The Turnbull government is trumpeting power price reductions as a consequence of its national energy guarantee – but a new analysis says subsidies for coal-fired power stations will render those forecasts “virtually meaningless”. The government has failed to rule out the building of new coal plants as a consequence of its underwriting of new power generation, and Labor declaring that development a deal breaker. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 13:00
Politicians and farmers say water should be diverted to crops to keep herds alive There are growing calls for the federal and state governments to start selling government-owned environmental water entitlements to farmers to alleviate the drought and to keep livestock alive. But the proposals would see wetlands and river courses starved of water with potential environmental stress from the drought exacerbated by the diversion of water onto farmland. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 12:41
A new study uses data gathered by floating drones in the Southern Ocean over past winters to learn how much carbon dioxide is transferred by the surrounding seas. Results show that in winter the open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon dioxide than previously believed.
08/14/2018 - 12:04
Judy Hindley says we must increase the price of fossil fuels, and Iain Climie raises the issue of climate change refugees While I appreciate your work in keeping the spotlight on the global heatwave (World on fire: the rise of the 50C city, G2, 13 August), I’m scared by the emphasis of your correspondents and leader writers on “adapting” to climate change (Letters, 11 July). You don’t “adapt” to a raging fire, do you? You have to stop it. And the first thing you need to do is stop pouring fuel on it. Leading scientists worldwide now agree that the main cause of the climate crisis is the burning of fossil fuels, and leading economists agree that the solution is to price fossil fuels out of the market. Until that happens, we will be paying – with our health, our lives and our children’s future. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 10:00
Cyclical natural phenomena that affect planet’s climate will amplify effect of manmade global warming, scientists warn The world is likely to see more extreme temperatures in the coming four years as natural warming reinforces manmade climate change, according to a new global forecasting system. Following a summer of heatwaves and forest fires in the northern hemisphere, the study in the journal Nature Communications suggests there will be little respite for the planet until at least 2022, and possibly not even then. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 09:14
The unusual timing of highly-productive summer plankton blooms off Greenland indicates a connection between increasing amounts of meltwater and nutrients in these coastal waters. Researchers now show that this connection exists, but is much more complex than widely supposed. Whether increasing meltwater has a positive or negative effect on summertime phytoplankton depends on the depth at which a glacier sits in the ocean.
08/14/2018 - 06:39
Those interested in mass of oils and wet wipes can now watch a sample of it sweat and grow Those who wish to watch the slow sweating of a disgusting, calcified mass of faeces, fats, oils, wet wipes and sanitary products can now do so at the click of a mouse. The Museum of London announced on Tuesday that it had permanently acquired samples of fatbergs and would livestream them to the world. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 06:31
First UK sighting of tiny jellyfish species normally found in the Yangtze basin in China First came the wasps, exotic sharks and marauding seagulls. Now the long hot summer has revealed another initially alarm-inducing animal in British waters – or more precisely, in the Middlewich branch of the Shropshire Union Canal. Freshwater jellyfish more normally found in the Yangtze basin in China have been spotted swimming in the waters near Bridge 23 of the canal between Middlewich and Winsford, according to the Canal & River Trust. Continue reading...
08/14/2018 - 05:59
Heat now kills more Americans than floods, hurricanes or other natural disasters – but cities are facing it almost entirely alone On yet another day of roasting heat in Phoenix, elderly and homeless people scurry between shards of shade in search of respite at the Marcos De Niza Senior Center. Along with several dozen other institutions in the city, it has been set up as a cooling centre: a free public refuge, with air conditioning, chilled bottled water, boardgames and books. Last summer a record 155 people died in Phoenix from excess heat, and the city is straining to avoid a repeat. James Sanders, an 83-year-old who goes by King, has lived in the city for 60 years and considers himself acclimatised to the baking south Arizona sun. “It does seem hotter than it used to be, though,” he says as he picks at his lunch, the temperature having climbed to 42C (107F) outside. “Maybe it’s my age. Maybe the wind isn’t blowing. It can’t get much hotter than this though. Can it?” Continue reading...