Breaking Waves: Ocean News

02/17/2020 - 19:18
Government pledges to spend £20m turning canals, mines and rail lines into heat sources The canals of the West Midlands may seem an unlikely source of warmth, but these waterways could soon be used to heat hospitals and tower blocks under a plan to harness Britain’s hidden heating sources. The government has promised to spend more than £20m on nine schemes across the country to exploit cheap, renewable heat from canals, old mineshafts and in London tube lines. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 17:49
Drop from level 2 to level 1 restrictions announced after the ‘biggest rain event in 20 years’ Water restrictions will be relaxed across Sydney in a fortnight following the boost to dam levels from the “biggest rain event in 20 years”. The change from level 2 to level 1 restrictions will take effect from 1 March when water quality in the catchment’s dams is expected to have improved. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 16:23
A new study suggests that iron fertilization may not have a significant impact on phytoplankton growth, at least on a global scale.
02/17/2020 - 14:06
Government pledges to spend £20m turning canals, mines and rail lines into heat sources The canals of the West Midlands may seem an unlikely source of warmth, but these waterways could soon be used to heat hospitals and tower blocks under a plan to harness Britain’s hidden heating sources. The government has promised to spend more than £20m on nine schemes across the country to exploit cheap, renewable heat from canals, old mineshafts and in London tube lines. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 12:49
Discovery of reptiles comes days after 13 royal pythons were found in same location A second nest of 16 snakes has been found dumped outside a fire station, days after 13 royal pythons were found in the same spot. Related: Scottish animal welfare baffled by python mutilation in Aberdeen Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 11:30
Survey shows ‘significant and substantial’ decline in the popularity of Scott Morrison and the Coalition Australia’s bushfire crisis has caused a spike in concern about the environment, a hit to the popularity of the Coalition and Scott Morrison and a drop in support for new coalmines, even among Coalition voters. Those are the conclusions of a poll of 3,249 Australians conducted by the Australian National University’s Centre for Social Research and Methods, which found a “significant and substantial decline” in the Coalition’s vote from 40% in October 2019 to 35% in January. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 11:30
Engineers at the University of Queensland say technology could be used to power small devices, such as a phone, within two years A flexible solar “skin” that could be used to generate power on homes, cars and phones is a step closer to development after the technology was used to break a world record for electricity conversion, researchers say. Engineers at the University of Queensland have been working with nanoparticles known as quantum dots that pass electrons and generate an electrical current when exposed to solar energy. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 11:23
Government urged to create more natural drainage systems to cope with impact of crisis Britain must brace for more storms like Dennis and Ciara because rainfall will be more intense in a climate-disrupted future, scientists have warned. They said the government needed to increase the creation of more natural drainage systems if it wanted to avoid having to raise the level of sea and river defences every few years to counter the growing threat of flooding and storm surges. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 11:04
Action at Trinity part of week-long protests over ties between colleges and fossil fuel industry Extinction Rebellion protesters have dug up the lawn of Trinity College, Cambridge, as part of a week-long series of demonstrations. The climate activists dug channels into the turf in front of the college’s 16th-century great gate with shovels and pitchforks and planted Extinction Rebellion flags. Continue reading...
02/17/2020 - 11:00
Reductions in air and water pollution are most likely reason, say scientists Freshwater insects, mosses and lichens are bucking the trend of wildlife losses in the UK and have expanded their ranges since 1970, according to a new study. Reductions in air and water pollution are the most likely reason. Scientists say their new analysis shows that amid big declines in wildlife, action can help to reverse the trend for some species. The work analysed millions of sightings of 5,000 different invertebrate species by volunteers over 45 years. Continue reading...