Breaking Waves: Ocean News

07/01/2016 - 23:30
Rosebush, Pembrokeshire Views from this bleak saddle take in the headlands that ruckle the northern coast of Pembrokeshire Bwlch Gwynt – “wind-pass” - lies between the two westernmost summits of Mynydd Preseli’s moorland ridge. The name fits perfectly with this bleak saddle marred by extensive forestry clearcut. Views distract attention from the ruined immediate landscape. They spread wide, take in Ramsey, the craggy crest of Ynys Bery off its southern tip, isolated rocks of the Bishops and Clerks in the sea beyond, and all the magnificent headlands – Dinas, Strumble, Penmaen Dewi – that ruckle the northern coast of Pembrokeshire. Stonehenge’s bluestone menhirs were dragged from Preseli millennia ago in a dumbfounding, still-incomprehensible feat of megalithic engineering. But the oriental end of Preseli’s seven-mile whaleback whence they came (they’ve been identified as originating from the spiky outcrop of Carn Goedog) has a different character to its occidental heights. Here the ridge reaches its 536-metre highest point at Foel Cwmcerwyn, two miles distant from and 140 metres above the road that crosses through the bwlch. Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 20:04
Vehicles made before January 1997 banned from streets of French capital from 8am to 8pm, Monday to Friday Paris has banned old cars from its streets in a war on air pollution that environmentalists hope will also drive dirty vehicles from the centres of other European cities. Air pollution, in large part caused by fine particulate fuel emissions, kills 48,000 people each year in France, about 400,000 in Europe and around 3.7 million worldwide, data published by France’s public health agency this month showed. Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 13:26
Ocean Leadership ~ http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=222a27da663bc7a6c129815e5&id=f9bd222112 The post ONW: Week of June 27, 2016 – Number 324 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
07/01/2016 - 12:51
Ocean Leadership ~ Returning from a brief trip to Nashville to visit family (and some folks in the country music industry interested in the ocean, e.g., (“Rock the Ocean”), my wife and I drove through the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains and even went on a short hike. As I enjoyed a brief escape from human infrastructure and city life, I pondered the interconnectivity of today’s world and how it has changed our ability to observe and monitor the ocean in such a relatively short period of history. I was ~500 miles from the ocean but had the capability to pull out my phone and check coastal tides and surf conditions in Virginia Beach, read about “Frankenturtles,” or watch live video from a venting hot spring one mile below the ocean’s surface 250 miles off the west coast. Technology has truly transformed our world — I think back to the first time I drove through this area with my wife in 1982, when the internet, email, and cell phones were more science fiction concepts than potential reality. While technology and industry have certainly presented challenges to our ocean and environment, I know they also provide the opportunity to meet these challenges and to help shape a sustainable, prosperous future for our oceanic planet that supports all life and retains its natural beauty. This is why I am thrilled that we recently added three affiliate (corporate) members to our Consortium: Autonomous Surface Vehicles (ASV), Severn Marine Technologies, and the Eastman Chemical Company. The commitment of all of our affiliate members to the ocean and its future is admirable, and I look forward to advancing their role and participation with other COL members and partners as we sail into Ocean Leadership’s future. My brief, but inspiring, visit with Eastman Chemical in Kingsport, as my travels wound through the Tennessee foothills, confirmed the great opportunity we have to strengthen the collective voice of good ocean science and technology in the days ahead.           The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee may have been pondering the same ideas about interconnectivity and technology that I was, as they passed a few relevant pieces of legislation out of committee (one would ensure that those living in — or driving through — rural areas receive adequate call delivery, i.e., fewer dropped calls). At the same markup, the committee also amended and passed the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act. You may recognize this as the America COMPETES Act, one of the most important authorizing pieces of legislation to the science community. We are very pleased with the bipartisan and stakeholder-inclusive manner in which this bill was developed. The bill maintains the successful components of our federal science program, addresses concerns raised by the scientific community (such as researchers’ administrative burden), outlines clear federal policy, clarifies expectations and processes for partners, improves federal oversight, and seeks to expand the demographics of STEM. For a more detailed review, see the story in our newsletter below.  Jointly with the National Association of Marine Laboratories, we sent a letter to the committee regarding the specifics of this bill. -JonRADM Jonathan W. White, USN (ret.)President and CEOConsortium for Ocean Leadership Member Highlight Tune Into Blue Serengeti Tonight at 10PM EST on Discovery Channel’s Shark Week A team of scientists from Stanford University, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and University of California Santa Cruz are featured in a science documentary called Blue Serengeti. “Blue Serengeti tells the story of why Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary is a lunch stop for many large predators and makes the direct comparison between Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and the Great Serengeti Parks of Africa,” said Professor Barbara Block of Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station. The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 7-1-2016 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
07/01/2016 - 11:19
The week’s top environment news stories and green events. If you are not already receiving this roundup, sign up here to get the briefing delivered to your inbox Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 10:42
A post-Brexit Britain could choose whether to adopt new pollution limits to cut emissions of five key pollutants, including NOx and PM2.5 A post-Brexit UK government should respect a new EU deal designed to halve the number of premature deaths from air pollution, MEPs have said. Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 08:17
Ocean Leadership ~ (Click to enlarge) Adelie Penguin (Credit: John De Jong / Picasa) Penguins — easily the most known and beloved wild animal in Antarctica — could be decimated by man-made global warming over the coming decades, according to a new study. (From USA Today / by Doyle Rice)– Habitat loss caused from warmer water and loss of sea ice could bring a 60% decline in population of the Adélie penguin by 2099, said study lead author Megan Cimino. For millions of years,  Adélie penguins across Antarctica weathered natural climate change as glaciers expanded and melted. The penguins needed the warm periods as shrinking glaciers allowed them to return to their rocky breeding grounds. But the study concludes that such helpful warming may have reached its tipping point. Longer warm periods may be shrinking the penguins’ habitat, leading to the declining population. “It is only in recent decades that we know Adélie penguins population declines are associated with warming, which suggests that many regions of Antarctica have warmed too much and that further warming is no longer positive for the species,” Cimino said. A 2009 study reported that another penguin species — the emperor penguin — could face extinction by 2100 as Antarctic sea ice melts. “Sea ice is essential to the emperor penguin life cycle, as the animals use it to breed, feed, and molt,” the authors said in the 2009 study. The new study, published in the journal Scientific Reports on Wednesday, looked at various levels of warming expected over this century as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations’ group that is the gold standard for climate forecasts. The study used satellite observations from 1981-2010 of sea surface temperature, sea ice and bare rock locations, and penguin population estimates from satellite photos to predict the impact of warming trends on the penguins. Overall, the researchers reported that climate change impacts on penguins in Antarctica will likely be highly site-specific, based on regional climate trends. Some parts of the continent, and thus some of the penguins, may not be as affected by climate change as others. Read the full article here: http://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2016/06/29/global-warming-threatens-penguin-population/86487126/ The post Penguins Losing Habitat In Antarctica, Could Be Decimated By 2099 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
07/01/2016 - 08:06
Board of EDF, energy project’s key backer, is at risk of fracturing as ex-supporters worry about uncertainty of British government Britain’s flagship energy project, Hinkley Point C, is hanging by a thread as critics inside key backer EDF use the political turmoil from the Brexit vote to try to derail the already delayed £18bn scheme. Jean Bernard Levy, the EDF group chief executive, and the French and British governments, have in recent days insisted they are as committed as ever to a positive final investment decision being taken as soon as possible. Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 07:41
Fruit bats, Joshua trees and thousands of flamingos are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
07/01/2016 - 06:20
Westminster, Tower Hamlets and Southwark have highest number of secondaries in breach of legal limits of NO2, new research for the mayor reveals Children at nearly 90 secondary schools in London breathe illegal and dangerous levels of air pollution, a report for the mayor reveals. Former mayor Boris Johnson was accused in May of burying a report that showed hundreds of primary schools were in areas that breached EU pollution limits in 2010, prompting calls for greater action to clean up the capital’s air. Continue reading...