Breaking Waves: Ocean News

07/15/2018 - 23:30
Aigas, Highlands: The weasel may be tiny, but this fierce predator can dispatch and drag off a full-grown rabbit 25 times its size – and has a stare that even humans can find unnerving If I asked you to name Britain’s most savage wildlife killer, you might say fox or peregrine or goshawk, or perhaps even the golden eagle or the Scottish wildcat if you knew about such exciting rarities. But I think you would be wrong. Savage and killers they all are, no question, but in my book none comes close to the smallest UK mustelid, the weasel, Mustela nivalis, so tiny that its skull can pass through a wedding ring. A few days ago I watched one hunting. It vanished into a rockery and emerged a few seconds later with a vole dangling from its jaws. Voles, rats and mice, as well as small birds, are a weasel’s staple, but a male will take much larger prey such as a full-grown rabbit, up to 25 times its own weight, kill it, and, incredibly, drag it away into cover. No other British predator does that. Continue reading...
07/14/2018 - 17:00
With more funding and product stewardship, the recycling crisis could turn into an opportunity There’s nothing like a crisis to spur on the search for a solution. Since January, when China stopped accepting our contaminated recycling, Australia has been struggling with a waste crisis. While some local councils have tried to adapt their processes, some have been stockpiling recycling while others are sending it straight to landfill. And there’s still no long-term solution in place. Continue reading...
07/14/2018 - 09:01
Exclusive: Australia Institute modelling reveals the best way to protect coal jobs in other regions is to stop Galilee developments Developing new coalmines in the Galilee Basin would cost 12,500 jobs in existing coalmining regions and replace only two in three workers, modelling by the Australia Institute shows. Job creation has long been an aggressive rallying call for supporters of Adani’s Carmichael megamine and other proposals in the untapped Galilee Basin, which combined would produce 150m tonnes of thermal coal each year. Continue reading...
07/14/2018 - 07:45
Residents of Innaarsuit fear the 100-metre high berg will break up and cause a tsunami A 100-metre (330ft) high iceberg has drifted close to a tiny settlement on Greenland’s west coast, prompting fears of a tsunami if it breaks up. Authorities have told residents of the Innaarsuit island settlement living near the shore to move to higher ground. Continue reading...
07/14/2018 - 01:30
Hull of research vessel officially known as RRS David Attenborough launches into the River Mersey The vessel popularly known as Boaty McBoatface will make its debut on Saturday in Liverpool, where the hull will be launched into the River Mersey before shipbuilders get to work finishing the ship in wet basin. RRS Sir David Attenborough – the boat was officially named after the naturalist after the internet poll’s top suggestion was rejected – will be used by the British Antarctic Survey for polar research from next year, when it is expected to be completed. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 15:30
Data from Nasa satellites has been matched with weather station information to reveal a chilly new low Where is the coldest place on Earth? Antarctica; yes, but where exactly? On 23 July 1983, the thermometer at the Vostok station, high on the East Antarctic plateau on recorded the lowest measured air temperature on Earth: a frigid -89.2C. But, in recent years, satellite data has revealed it can get even colder. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 15:00
The Inconvenience Store in Melbourne is providing fresh produce to people doing it tough A man places his shopping bag on the counter filled with canned goods, fruit, vegetables and a loaf of bread. He passes it to a woman, who weighs the bag, while her colleague makes a note on a clipboard. Then they wish him luck. “Come back soon,” 19-year-old Vincent Hui tells him. No money changes hands. Asked why he had come to the shop, the man tells Guardian Australia: “Some days are just tough.” Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 13:40
The workspace company gave environmental reasons for banning meat from all budgets, including their upcoming festival WeWork, the real estate company that rents out and manages office space, has announced that they will no longer hold any staff events that include meat, and that staff will not be able to expense any meals that include poultry, pork or red meat. In an email to staff, WeWork co-founder Miguel McKelvey also said that WeWork’s upcoming Summer Camp event, a music and food festival which is only open to WeWork members, will not serve any meat options. Tickets to the event cost as much as $409 (£309) – a high price based, in part, on the free food available once on site. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 10:28
From Europe to Africa, extreme and widespread heat raises climate concerns in hottest La Niña year to date on record Record high temperatures have been set across much of the world this week as an unusually prolonged and broad heatwave intensifies concerns about climate change. The past month has seen power shortages in California as record heat forced a surge of demand for air conditioners. Algeria has experienced the hottest temperature ever reliably registered in Africa. Britain, meanwhile, has experienced its third longest heatwave, melting the roof of a science building in Glasgow and exposing ancient hill forts in Wales. Continue reading...
07/13/2018 - 09:38
Thousands of schools closing roads and setting up park and stride schemes Schools across the country are moving to ban the school run amid growing concern about the devastating impact of air pollution on young people’s health. The Guardian has found that thousands of schools in cities and towns – from Edinburgh to London, Manchester to Ellesmere Port – are taking measures to try to deter parents using their cars. These include closing roads, setting up “park and stride” schemes, walk-to-school initiatives and “playing dead” protests. Continue reading...