Breaking Waves: Ocean News

06/17/2018 - 13:00
New report says Australian companies lag behind international organisations Australian companies are not doing enough work to model the risks of climate change and how it will affect their profitability, a new report by a thinktank says. Progressive thinktank the Centre for Policy Development says that while most companies have committed to considering what climate change and the Paris climate agreement means for their business strategy, too few have begun using scenario analysis techniques to model what its impacts could be and how to respond to it. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 13:00
In two decades coal seam gas has come to account for 30% of gas production. Here’s how the picture varies state to state • ‘Not safe, not wanted’: is the end of NT fracking ban a taste of things to come? Australia’s production of coal seam gas has risen exponentially since 1995, going from zero to 30% of the country’s overall gas production in 2015-16. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 08:01
Firm hopes to better conventional batteries to store renewably generated power A chemical compound commonly used to boost crop yields could be the answer to helping the world increase its consumption of renewable energy. In a world first, Siemens is opening a £1.5m pilot project in Oxfordshire employing ammonia as a new form of energy storage. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 07:14
In nearly 30 years, a bunch of surfers concerned about pollution have become a serious marine conservation force. An unexpected royal patronage has given them more funding and greater reach than ever to fight plastic pollution Despite its eye-catching name, Surfers Against Sewage probably owes its existence to plastic. “The advent of panty-liners meant you could really see sewage slicks. Condoms, panty-liners and other plastic refuse made for a visceral, and visual, reminder of pollution,” Chris Hines, surfer and co-founder of this small charity in Cornwall, recalled in Alex Wade’s book, Surf Nation. Sick of ear, throat and gastric infections, he and others called a meeting in St Agnes village hall. A who’s who of the most committed, passionate surfers in Cornwall – and just about the whole village – turned out. It was 1990 and Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) was born. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 06:00
Head of Syngenta, world’s biggest pesticide maker, says rejecting farming tech could have serious consequences within 20 years The world is likely to face food shortages within 20 years if pesticides and genetically modified crops are shunned, according to the head of the world’s biggest pesticide manufacturer. J Erik Fyrwald, CEO of Syngenta, also said the technologies to produce more food from less land are vital in halting climate change, but that better targeting will mean farmers around the world will use less pesticide in future. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 03:00
There is a crisis in the countryside – and a massive decline in insect numbers could have significant consequences for the environment When Simon Leather was a student in the 1970s, he took a summer job as a postman and delivered mail to the villages of Kirk Hammerton and Green Hammerton in North Yorkshire. He recalls his early morning walks through its lanes, past the porches of houses on his round. At virtually every home, he saw the same picture: windows plastered with tiger moths that had been attracted by lights the previous night and were still clinging to the glass. “It was quite a sight,” says Leather, who is now a professor of entomology at Harper Adams University in Shropshire. But it is not a vision that he has experienced in recent years. Those tiger moths have almost disappeared. “You hardly see any, although there used to be thousands in summer and that was just a couple of villages.” Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 01:00
With the base rate in the eurozone still at 0%, funds are flowing back to the US using a myriad of financial instruments While governments around the world contemplate the fallout from Donald Trump’s trade war with China, banks are wrestling with central bank moves that are likely to have a much more fundamental impact on the global economy. On Wednesday the US Federal Reserve pressed ahead with its policy of raising interest rates, adding a seventh quarter-point rise since 2015 to leave the base rate at 1.75-2%. The Fed also pledged to continue selling back to the private markets loans it bought as part of a vast $4.5 trillion quantitative easing programme. Continue reading...
06/17/2018 - 00:00
A ‘dream team’ of international scientists scaled Mozambique’s Mount Lico and found a wealth of new species Allianceearth.org Continue reading...
06/16/2018 - 10:31
Team of researchers changes microbes in koalas’ guts in order to improve type of food they consume Scientists believe they have found a new weapon in the battle to save endangered species: faecal transplants. They say that by transferring faeces from the gut of one animal to another they could boost the health and viability of endangered creatures. In particular, they believe the prospects of saving the koala could be boosted this way. The idea of using faecal transplants as conservation weapons was highlighted this month at the American Society for Microbiology meeting in Atlanta, where scientists outlined experiments in which they used the technique to change microbes in the guts of koalas. Continue reading...
06/16/2018 - 01:30
A new report argues we’d all benefit if the government started taking the cycle industry seriously If a country wants to make things, it needs a domestic steel industry. Our government considers this industry to be one of national strategic importance. But you would think it was also important to keep people moving, to make sure the air they breathe is clean and to look after their health. It just so happens that cycling is one of the ways to unsnarl traffic congestion, reduce pollution and make folks hale and hearty. People who cycle to work even have fewer days off sick. Continue reading...