Breaking Waves: Ocean News

11/15/2018 - 12:00
Booming LNG sector is driving Australia’s carbon output, but industry claims revealing the details would damage international competitiveness The Australian oil and gas lobby is pushing to limit public information about greenhouse gas emissions from liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants, a move that contradicts the global industry’s pledge to increase transparency about their impact on the climate. The Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (Appea) has called for LNG plants to be able to apply for emissions data to be withheld from the public on the grounds that releasing it could help its competitors overseas. It has been backed by Chevron, which operates the Gorgon and Wheatstone LNG developments in Western Australia. Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 09:59
Ocean Leadership ~ (Prentice Danner/USCG) Equipping every ship that enters the Arctic with sensors could help fill critical gaps in maritime charts (From Arctic Today/By Melody Schreiber) Throughout world, the ocean floor’s details remain largely a mystery; less than 10 percent has been mapped using modern sonar technology. Even in the United States, which has some of the best maritime maps in the world, only one-third of the ocean and coastal waters have been mapped to modern standards. But perhaps the starkest gaps in knowledge are in the Arctic. Only 4.7 percent of the Arctic has been mapped to modern standards. “Especially when you get up north, the percentage of charts that are basically based on Royal Navy surveys from the 19th century is terrifying — or should be terrifying,” said David Titley, a retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral who directs the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at the Pennsylvania State University. Titley spoke alongside several other maritime experts at a recent Woodrow Wilson Center event on marine policy, highlighting the need for improved oceanic maps. When he was on active duty in the Navy, Titley said, “we were finding sea mounts that we had no idea were there. And conversely, we were getting rid of sea mounts on charts that weren’t there.” […] “It’s hard to map the bottom of the ocean,” said Rear Admiral Jon White, president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership. “It’s like trying to map your backyard with ants, with the ships that we have.” However, he said, the technology to do so is improving. “There are great opportunities for the people who understand this technology, to make new ways, better ways to actually map it faster,” White said. Moving forward, he said, both federal investment and public-private partnerships should focus on “getting every ship to be a sensor in the ocean.” That effort will be crucial for accomplishing “all the things that we’re trying to do in the maritime environment,” he said. Read the full article here: https://www.arctictoday.com/ordinary-shipping-help-map-uncharted-arctic-ocean-seafloor/ The post How Ordinary Ship Traffic Could Help Map The Uncharted Arctic Ocean Seafloor appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
11/15/2018 - 07:59
Surprise judgment means government must halt capacity market scheme The UK’s scheme for ensuring power supplies during the winter months has been suspended after a ruling by the European court of justice that it constitutes illegal state aid. Payments to energy firms under the £1bn capacity market scheme will be halted until the government can win permission from the European commission to restart it. Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 06:00
The industry has political supremacy even in left-leaning states, but immediate action can hold off an environmental state of emergency The world’s leading scientists issued a report warning of total planetary dystopia unless we take immediate steps to seriously reduce carbon emissions. Then, oil and gas corporations dumped millions of dollars into the 2018 elections to defeat the major initiatives that could have slightly reduced fossil fuel use. Though you may not know it from the cable TV coverage, this was one of the most significant – and the most terrifying – stories of the midterms. For those who actually care about the survival of the human race, the key questions now should be obvious: is there any reason to hope that we will retreat from “drill baby drill” and enact a sane set of climate policies? Or is our country – and, by extension, our species – just going to give up? Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 02:01
Greenpeace says retailers failing to take responsibility for reducing footprint Big supermarkets are producing billions of single-use plastic bags each year despite charges that are designed to reduce their use by the public. The UK’s 10 leading supermarkets, including Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons, Waitrose, Co-op and Aldi, continue to put plastic bags into their shops three years after the introduction of 5p charges under EU law. Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 02:00
Neighbors in tiny Seminole Springs are banding together in the aftermath of California’s deadly wildfires Roger Kelly had been up through the night, watching the orange glow emanating from the hillside above his home of 30 years. The Seminole Springs mobile home park, a co-op of 215 small lakeside homes tucked into the canyon between Malibu and Agoura Hills, was on the warpath of the most destructive fire to ever hit Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 02:00
Retired engineer and manager Bill Bray volunteers with Citizens Climate Lobby, which aims to meet with all legislators twice a year Bill Bray makes sure to wear his ExxonMobil baseball cap to the farmers’ markets and Rotary clubs he visits in Texas to talk about climate change. Related: Shell boss says mass reforestation needed to limit temperature rises to 1.5C Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 01:00
Lancaster students win £30,000 prize for O-Wind turbine after scooping UK equivalent A spinning turbine that can capture wind travelling in any direction and could transform how consumers generate electricity in cities has won its inventors a prestigious international award and £30,000 prize. Nicolas Orellana, 36, and Yaseen Noorani, 24, MSc students at Lancaster University, scooped the James Dyson award for their O-Wind Turbine, which – in a technological first – takes advantage of both horizontal and vertical winds without requiring steering. Continue reading...
11/15/2018 - 01:00
Hilcorp’s plan to extract 70,000 barrels a day follows Trump’s reversal of an Obama-era ban on fossil fuel activity in the region Plans to establish the first oil drilling operation in US Arctic waters have hit an ironic snag – a lack of sea ice caused by rapid warming in the region. Last month, the Trump administration approved the go-ahead of the Liberty project to extract oil from beneath the Beaufort Sea, off Alaska’s north coast. The drilling would be the first of its kind in federal waters in the Arctic and follows Trump’s reversal of an Obama-era ban on fossil fuel activity in the polar region. Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 22:03
Coral reef scientist jointly awarded John Maddox prize weeks after his research centre lost government funding Judges have awarded an Australian scientist a prestigious international prize, saying he has battled political smears and public attempts to discredit his work in order to shine a light on the devastating effects of climate change on coral reefs. Prof Terry Hughes was jointly awarded the John Maddox prize on Wednesday for bringing public attention to coral bleaching. Continue reading...