Breaking Waves: Ocean News

11/14/2018 - 08:59
Latest legal skirmish in a long battle between activists and the company building the pipeline, which is also behind Keystone XL Landowners in Louisiana’s Atchafalaya Basin have filed suit against the company building the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline for trespassing and property damage, claiming that it did not obtain legal authority before running stretches of the nearly completed pipeline through their property. It’s the latest legal skirmish in a long battle between Louisiana activists and Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), which is also behind the the more well-known Dakota Access pipeline, and one that advocates hope might shutter the nearly completed 160-mile stretch of pipe before it goes live. Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 08:01
Jack Harries was at protest by Extinction Rebellion aiming to bring London to a standstill The social media influencer Jack Harries has said young people have a duty to protest against environmental destruction, as he took part in a day of protest in London that led to at least 14 arrests. The 25-year-old, whose YouTube channel has 4 million subscribers, spoke to the Guardian as he helped hold a 68-metre banner over the side of Westminster Bridge with the words: “Climate change: we’re fucked”. Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 06:00
Fresh division among environmentalists over nuclear energy, the single largest source of low-carbon electricity Looming climate breakdown is opening fresh divisions among environmentalists over nuclear energy, with a major advocacy group calling for struggling nuclear plants to be propped up to avoid losing their low-carbon power. Nuclear is the single largest source of low-carbon electricity in the US. But a third of nuclear plants are unprofitable or scheduled to close, risking a rise in greenhouse gas emissions if they are replaced by coal or natural gas, a major Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) report has found. Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 05:56
Kazakhstan is rich with oil, gas and coal but Nursultan Nazarbayev, its president for life, has committed the country to a dramatic shift from fossil fuels to green energy. Is this huge nation, which is beset by rural poverty, major infrastructure challenges and environmental crises, able to realise his vision? Phoebe Greenwood travels to  the Kazakh capital, Astana, and the Aral Sea region Many thanks to Kunzberg spatial communications for the use of music from the Future Astana Expo installation Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 04:30
Retailer’s choice highlighting impact of palm oil production is deemed too political for TV Iceland is to unleash a life-size animatronic orangutan on the streets of the UK after its Christmas advert highlighting the impact of palm oil production was banned for breaching political advertising rules.The supermarket chain has turned to special effects technology befitting Hollywood to create an ultra-realistic robotic orangutan for a stunt to raise awareness of the plight facing the species from deforestation of its habitat for palm oil production.The orangutan, created by a team who have worked on films and TV shows including Doctor Who and Sherlock, will first appear clinging to a Christmas tree in Coin Street, south London, before moving to other locations, including Oxford Street and several parks in the capital.It will then appear at a number of Iceland stores around the country, including Manchester and Birmingham, apparently “searching for a new home”. The replica orangutan is controlled remotely and by a specialist puppeteer who has studied the ape’s movements. Last week, Iceland’s rebadging of an animated short film was rejected by Clearcast, the body that vets adverts, for breaching rules banning political advertising in the 2003 Communications Act.The ban prompted a public outcry, with stars including James Corden, Anna Friel and Paloma Faith supporting a campaign to allow it to be aired on TV. This commercial was banned from TV for being too political. I think everyone should see it x pic.twitter.com/ns2XnGSnv6 Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 03:00
Trees grow thicker bark and animals burrow for protection. We can use similar techniques to save human lives California wildfires rarely killed civilians in the 20th century. The Griffith Park fire killed 29 in 1933, while 25 died in Oakland in 1991. Now, for the fourth time in just over a year, California wildfires have become deadly. Within the span of 13 months, nearly 100 civilians have died in wildfires in California, and that devastating number is likely to grow based on the missing persons tally from the town of Paradise. The increasing number of fatalities is occurring globally in so-called Mediterranean climates – regions with mild, wet winters and warm, dry summers. Portugal, Spain, Greece, Chile, Australia and South Africa have all seen civilian wildfire fatalities in recent years, and communities globally are asking themselves the same question: what can we do? How do we stem the soaring number of wildfire fatalities? Continue reading...
11/14/2018 - 00:00
Coal, oil and gas subsidies risking rise in global temperatures to 3.2C, well beyond agreed Paris goal Climate action is way off course in all but one of the world’s 20 biggest economies, according to a report that shows politicians are paying more heed to the fossil fuel industry than to advice from scientists. Among the G20 nations 15 reported a rise in emissions last year, according to the most comprehensive stock-take to date of progress towards the goals of the Paris climate agreement. Continue reading...
11/13/2018 - 22:00
The world is waking up to the danger posed by single-use plastics to the environment. But consumer pressure is not enough to reverse the decades of plastic waste that litter the globe and clog up the oceans. Stephen Buranyi tells Anushka Asthana how an anti-plastic revolution is under way but the plastics industry is in no mood for retreat. Plus: George Monbiot on why climate change is a crisis that requires a response of civil disobedience Who is really to blame for the crisis in plastic waste across the globe? And is it too late to fix it? Stephen Buranyi explains how the rise of the plastics industry since the 1960s created a culture of disposable consumerism that has generated a global crisis of plastic waste. He describes how the industry in response poured money into anti-littering campaigns, but did not apply the same standards of waste control to itself. Plus: the Guardian environment correspondent, Matthew Taylor, explains who is responsible for the “tsunami of plastic” coming our way and what may be our only hope to stop it. Continue reading...
11/13/2018 - 20:35
‘By the time the science is proven, it will be too late to act,’ chief Peter Coleman says Woodside Petroleum chief executive, Peter Coleman, has joined mining giants BHP and Rio Tinto in calling for a price on carbon to help with emissions reduction targets and the transition to renewable energy. But the energy minister, Angus Taylor, has claimed Australia doesn’t need a carbon price as emissions levels are coming down – a position at odds with the government’s official emissions data and independent modelling. Continue reading...
11/13/2018 - 19:01
Work on engineered gene used to modify DNA of mosquitoes ‘could be stifled’ by perceived risk to environment Research on a radical new way to combat malaria and other devastating diseases could be knocked off track if a UN biodiversity conference imposes a moratorium on the work, a group of scientists have said. Some scientists believe the different approach has the potential to transform the battle against malaria. It involves engineered gene drives which are used to modify the DNA of wild organisms on a mass scale. In the case of mosquitoes the method would have the potential to wipe out populations of certain species which carry the malaria parasite, say the scientists. Continue reading...