Breaking Waves: Ocean News

11/12/2018 - 03:01
At first I kept an open mind about Trump’s interior secretary. But it soon became clear he put the oil, gas and mining industry above our mission Back in 2017, the staff at the interior department was not hoping for the best, we were hoping for the competent. A presidential transition can bring dramatic change to the leadership of a federal agency – particularly the agency that manages the conservation and use of one fifth of America’s land area and the seabed of our continental shelf. Civil servants pledge to continue to serve the American people and the agency mission regardless of whether or not they agree with the political positioning of the president and his cabinet. So we watched the Ryan Zinke confirmation hearings carefully, listening for hints at his management style, his communications style, and his general understanding and respect for public lands and the mission of the agency. These were the qualities that mattered, not his ideology. We were hoping for competence. Continue reading...
11/12/2018 - 03:01
Trump’s interior secretary has been remaking the agency charged with protecting public lands as an ally of big energy, e-mails and records reveal Since his first day on the job, when he surrounded himself with a National Park Service police escort and rode through Washington DC on a white-nosed horse named Tonto, the US interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, has exhibited a flair for ostentation. Not long after taking office in March 2017, the new secretary started flying a special flag, adorned with the agency’s bison seal, above the interior department’s elegant New Deal-era headquarters. At a cost of more than $2,000, he also commissioned commemorative coins emblazoned with his name to hand out to visitors and staff. He replaced the doors in his office to the tune of more than $130,000, and installed a hunting-themed arcade game in the department’s cafeteria. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 19:31
Councils say residents also erroneously putting recyclable waste into plastic bags before disposing of them Throwing soft plastics into the recycling bin is still the most common recycling mistake made by Australians, according to new research by Planet Ark. A survey of 180 councils commissioned by the environment organisation for Recycling Week asked councils to identify what were the most common recycling mistakes made by their residents. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 12:50
Readers take Attenborough to task for ignoring the human impact on the natural world I strongly agree with George’s Monbiot’s comments regarding David Attenborough’s latest BBC series, Dynasties (Attenborough has betrayed the living world that he loves, 7 November). Why have most of his wonderful programmes been blind to the tsunami of environmental destruction we have unleashed? Some years ago I confronted Alastair Fothergill, series producer of many of Attenborough’s programmes, at a public meeting: “The Earth is in distress: why do you ignore human impacts?” His response: “Our audience does not want to be disturbed.” What about the mess that future generations will be left with? In the 1980s I worked at Channel 4 for Fragile Earth, which broadcast some 20 environmental documentaries a year. But as soon as Michael Grade took over as CEO in 1988, he sacked the commissioning editor – advertisers did not like disturbing programmes. And so the global devastation continues largely unreported in TV documentaries. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 10:39
Drilling at Preston New Road site in Lancashire has triggered 37 minor quakes in three weeks A senior executive at the fracking company Cuadrilla privately said this summer it did not expect to cause earthquakes that would be serious enough to force it to halt operations. But despite that confidence, the company has triggered 37 minor quakessince it started fracking for gas at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire three weeks ago. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 10:03
Environmental law group submits objection over proposed 3.6GW Drax plant Plans to build a huge new UK gas power station are facing a challenge from an environmental law group that argues the project would breach the government’s recommendations on climate change. ClientEarth, which has repeatedly defeated the government in court over its air pollution strategy, has submitted an objection to the planning inspectorate over Drax Group’s proposed 3.6GW plant in North Yorkshire. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 07:53
Exclusive: ministers seeking to make firms pay more towards recycling their own waste Supermarkets, retailers and major drinks brands are set to pay tens of millions of pounds more towards recycling their used packaging under the government’s new waste strategy expected to be published this month, the Guardian understands. Supermarkets and other major producers of packaging waste currently pay a small fraction of the cost of collecting and recycling the 11m tonnes of packaging waste produced in the UK. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 02:00
The collapse of Toshiba’s project underlines the fact that new nuclear is a more unreliable proposition than wind and solar Toshiba’s decision to pull out of building a nuclear power station in Cumbria last week will cause shockwaves far beyond the north-west of England. The outcome is a disaster for the surrounding area, which is heavily reliant on the nuclear industry for jobs and prosperity. Local politicians admit it is a blow and a disappointment for Cumbrians hoping for roles at the proposed Moorside plant. They say they genuinely believe a new buyer for the site will come forward. But that looks like wishful thinking. Continue reading...
11/11/2018 - 01:59
Shortage of sheep and goats in Cyprus coupled with growing taste for grilled cheese in China ‘threatens global supplies’ It’s on restaurant menus from London to New York and has become a barbecue favourite far and wide. But, on the Mediterranean island where it has been made since medieval times, halloumi’s unprecedented global popularity has also begun to cause concern. Fears are being voiced that local dairy farmers soon won’t be able to keep up with demand. Continue reading...
11/08/2018 - 10:01
96 The Navigator- this month's essential Ocean update p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; font-family:inherit !important; font-weight:inherit !important; line-height:inherit !important; } #bodyCell{ padding:10px; } .templateContainer{ max-width:600px !important; } a.mcnButton{ display:block; } .mcnImage,.mcnRetinaImage{ vertical-align:bottom; } .mcnTextContent{ word-break:break-word; } .mcnTextContent img{ height:auto !important; } .mcnDividerBlock{ table-layout:fixed !important; } body,#bodyTable{ background-color:#; } #bodyCell{ border-top:0; } .templateContainer{ border:0; } h1{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:18px; font-style:normal; font-weight:bold; line-height:125%; letter-spacing:normal; text-align:left; } h2{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:18px; font-style:normal; font-weight:bold; line-height:125%; letter-spacing:normal; text-align:left; } h3{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:18px; font-style:normal; font-weight:bold; line-height:125%; letter-spacing:normal; text-align:left; } h4{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:18px; font-style:normal; font-weight:bold; line-height:125%; letter-spacing:normal; text-align:left; } #templatePreheader{ background-color:#FAFAFA; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:9px; padding-bottom:9px; } #templatePreheader .mcnTextContent,#templatePreheader .mcnTextContent p{ color:#656565; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:12px; line-height:150%; text-align:left; } #templatePreheader .mcnTextContent a,#templatePreheader .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#656565; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } #templateHeader{ background-color:#FFFFFF; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:9px; padding-bottom:0; } #templateHeader .mcnTextContent,#templateHeader .mcnTextContent p{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:16px; line-height:150%; text-align:left; } #templateHeader .mcnTextContent a,#templateHeader .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#2BAADF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } #templateBody{ background-color:#FFFFFF; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:2px solid #EAEAEA; padding-top:0; padding-bottom:9px; } #templateBody .mcnTextContent,#templateBody .mcnTextContent p{ color:#202020; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:16px; line-height:150%; text-align:left; } #templateBody .mcnTextContent a,#templateBody .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#2BAADF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } #templateFooter{ background-color:#FAFAFA; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:9px; padding-bottom:9px; } #templateFooter .mcnTextContent,#templateFooter .mcnTextContent p{ color:#656565; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:12px; line-height:150%; text-align:center; } #templateFooter .mcnTextContent a,#templateFooter .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#656565; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #bodyCell{ padding-top:10px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer{ min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupContent{ padding:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCaptionLeftContentOuter .mcnTextContent,.mcnCaptionRightContentOuter .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardTopImageContent,.mcnCaptionBottomContent:last-child .mcnCaptionBottomImageContent,.mcnCaptionBlockInner .mcnCaptionTopContent:last-child .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardBottomImageContent{ padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockInner{ padding-top:0 !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockOuter{ padding-top:9px !important; padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:22px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #templatePreheader{ display:block !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #templatePreheader .mcnTextContent,#templatePreheader .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #templateHeader .mcnTextContent,#templateHeader .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #templateBody .mcnTextContent,#templateBody .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ #templateFooter .mcnTextContent,#templateFooter .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } View this email in your browser Welcome to The Navigator! Seen from the Lighthouse – what's happening now? New global deal on nature Paris Peace Forum: make MPAs not war Busting illegal fishing crime Ocean Signals – short announcements   Waves on the Horizon – what's coming up? Sending out a climate SOS Ocean Reflection – a look back at what's been happening Antarctic melts while marine protection remains frozen Indonesia's Our Ocean racks up new commitments IMO – progress on Arctic heavy fuel oil ban and plastic ban adopted 20 new MPAs approved in South Africa Other Key News Recent Reports Latest Virgin Unite blogs   It’s been a busy Ocean month, with lots of exciting announcements about new commitments and initiatives coming out of the recent Our Ocean Conference (read on to learn more). We would be brimming with excitement given the US$10 billion and 300 new commitments made in Bali at the Our Ocean Conference. Unfortunately, they all have to be weighed against new science on ever-more warming waters, another eye-opening IPCC report and a shocking update on the state of global biodiversity. Then, of course, there's the continued stalemate in the Southern Ocean as key marine areas in the Antarctic have been denied protection. It all feels as if we are teetering precariously on the precipice of a climate and biodiversity disaster, but we’re just too obsessed with getting our best selfie instead of looking around and seeing what is really happening. Before you know it, we’ll be tumbling down into the unknown wondering why we were so damned stupid… Anyway, for some cheery news, read this month's bumper issue of The Navigator! -->      Seen from the Lighthouse – what's happening now? New global deal on nature The world has 2 years to secure a deal for nature to halt a silent killer as dangerous as climate change, warns Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) head Cristiana Pasca Palmer about the threat of biodiversity loss. From 17-29 November, 196 member governments will gather in Egypt to discuss the framework for a new global deal for nature that will come into effect in 2020. Back in 2010, the world’s governments agreed to a 10-year plan to conserve biodiversity, consisting of 20 targets known as the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. Eight years on, we are fast approaching the 2020 deadline and the world is still experiencing a major biodiversity crisis and we are “sleepwalking towards the edge of a cliff”. The findings of a major new report from WWF reveal that humanity has wiped out 60% of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles since 1970. This loss is threatening our whole life web – the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. We need more action and more ambitious, concrete global goals and targets.   On marine protection, Aichi biodiversity target 11 and SDG 14 call for at least 10% marine protection by 2020. To date only 3.7% of the global Ocean is under some sort of protection according to the Marine Conservation Institute’s Atlas of Marine Protection. The science recommends we strongly protect at least 30% of the Ocean by 2030 (30x30) to ensure a healthy and resilient ocean. This 30x30 goal is gaining more and more traction and now has some significant philanthropic backing, with the recent announcement of a US$1 billion campaign by the Wyss Foundation to conserve 30% of the planet in a natural state by the year 2030. A new global deal on nature needs to embrace these ambitious targets if we don’t want to dive off that biodiversity-loss cliff. But we probably need to go even further. Spearheaded by scientist E.O. Wilson, the Half Earth project calls for the protection of half of the Earth's land and sea if we stand any chance of reversing the species extinction crisis and to ensure our planet's long-term health. Here’s a reminder of what biodiversity is and why it really matters.   Paris Peace Forum: make MPAs not war To mark the 100-year anniversary of the end of the First World War, France is holding a memorial for world leaders in Paris, as well as hosting the first ever Paris Peace Forum (11-13 November), which was initiated by President Macron last year. The Forum hopes to be a place of “debate, solutions and innovation” and will centre around the themes of development, environment, inclusive economy, new technologies and peace and security. 150 governance-focused projects have been selected to present their work at the meeting, including Antarctica2020 – a group of champions from around the world working to secure the protection of 7 million km2 of the Southern Ocean by 2020. Peace isn’t just about having no war – it’s also strongly linked to good global governance and looking at how to reduce international tensions from the effects of climate change, resource scarcity and inequalities. All these issues are pertinent to Ocean governance as well. At the Forum, Antarctica2020 hopes to inspire leaders to look at the wider picture of climate change and biodiversity loss, and – given the recent disappointing result regarding Antarctic marine protection – to brainstorm ways to break the impasse of inaction and how we can work together as civil society, government and businesses to ensure protection.   To learn more about the meeting follow @ParisPeaceForum and #Antarctica2020.   Busting illegal fishing crime Last month, the lid was lifted on the shady and dangerous world of illegal fishing when the EU’s law enforcement agency (Europol) busted a multi-country organized crime ring dealing in more than 2.5 million kg of bluefin tuna annually, with a 12 million Euro profit. Operation Tarantelo found the volume of illegal bluefin tuna being sold in Europe is likely to be double that of the legal tuna trade. It also showed there’s still a lot to do to fight this global scourge, which is destructive, dangerous, unfair and inhuman: it steals marine life and has links to slavery and organized crime. See this recent report on the devastating impact illegal fishing is having on island states due to gun-running and drug trafficking by international criminal networks in the fishing industry. There is no silver bullet in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, though greater transparency is key – including through initiatives like Global Fishing Watch, which aims to shine a spotlight on the Ocean by tracking and sharing data. Together with Oceana, Global Fishing Watch has been working with the government of Peru to put at least 1,300 of its industrial fishing vessels on a publicly accessible website so their locations can be monitored in real-time. A new report just released by the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) ‘Out of the shadows’ sets out 10 global principles for transparency in fisheries. These include: giving every commercial vessel worldwide a unique vessel identifier (UVI), which will stay with it from the time it’s built until it’s scrapped; keeping information on the FAO Global Record of Fishing Vessels; ensuring up-to-date lists of fishing licenses and authorizations, vessel registries, human trafficking and other related crimes, and information on arrests and sanctions for IUU fishing activities; tracking systems; banning transshipments at sea unless they’re pre-authorized, subject to robust and verifiable electronic monitoring and covered by a human observer scheme; the need to adopt international measures, such as the FAO Port State Measures Agreement, the International Labour Organization Work in Fishing Convention (C188) and the IMO Cape Town Agreement on crew safety on fishing vessels. For more background on IUU fishing see Ocean Unite’s talking points.   -->      Ocean Signals – short announcements GERMAN OCEAN PRIZE: A big congratulations to EU Commissioner for the Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries and Ocean Unite Network member, Karmenu Vella, for winning the 2018 German Ocean Prize! This prize recognizes all his great work to ensure the protection of the ocean – such as trying to stop illegal fishing and supporting the protection of biodiversity in international waters.   NEW 'GOLD STANDARD' MPAS: Marine Conservation Institute’s GLORES initiative has recognized 7 new marine parks for their marine conservation achievements: Cape Rodney-Okakari Point Marine Reserve, Chumbe Island Coral Reef Sanctuary, Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park, Ilhas Selvagens, Misool Private Marine Reserve, Réserve Naturelle Marine de Cerbère-Banyuls and Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park.   2019 BOAT AWARDS: The nomination period is now underway for the Blue Marine Foundation and BOAT International's 2019 Ocean Awards. You can send in your nominations for any person or project you think is worthy of being recognized in any of the 5 categories via this link. And please share the link with your networks or on social media to encourage nominations. -->        Waves on the Horizon – what's coming up?  Sending out a Climate SOS The recent IPCC report set off a chorus of alarm bells that could not have been louder – it’s time to wake up and smell the climate change. We either invest now in significantly reducing greenhouse gases in the next 12 years, or we’re going to have to pay way more further down the line for damage to property, infrastructure, livelihoods, loss of lives and population displacement due to rising sea levels. See a shortened version – “Summary for Policy Makers”. The UN Secretary General urged all countries to make the upcoming Katowice Climate Conference (2-14 December) a success by listening to these top scientists on the need to raise ambition big time, make much stronger national climate action plans, and urgently accelerate implementation of the Paris Agreement.  ​ Records continue to be broken – but nobody is getting excited about them. For example, “Ocean heat content” has set a new record in the first half of 2018, with more warmth in the Ocean than at any time since records began in 1940. What does that mean for the Ocean and for us? Well for one, the hurricanes are going to keep coming, and much harder. Sea levels will inevitably rise and acidifying waters are harming marine life and their habitats.   But, the Ocean isn’t just a victim, it’s also part of the solution. A recent article found “high potential for Ocean-based options to address climate change and its impacts”. Fish carbon has been found to stabilize our climate and protecting wetlands helps communities reduce damage from hurricanes and storms. If you want to become an expert on the role of the Ocean in our planet’s climate check out these 14 factsheets on Ocean and climate by the Ocean & Climate platform. And if you want a change from reading, watch #OceanforClimate TV. -->        Ocean Reflection – a look back at what's been happening Antarctic melts while marine protection proposals remain frozen As an iceberg 5 times the size of Manhattan calved off West Antarctica, the body tasked with protecting Antarctic marine life (CCAMLR) again failed to agree on the creation of further marine protected areas in the region, despite worldwide warnings on the impacts of climate change and the need to significantly curb biodiversity loss. This year, 3 MPAs were on the table for a decision – in East Antarctica, the Weddell Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula. However all 3 proposals were unsuccessful. For the 7th year in a row a joint proposal (by Australia and the EU, led by France) to protect the East Antarctic failed, with China and Russia yet again blocking the consensus needed. For the Weddell Sea, Norway joined Russia and China in their opposition of creating what would be the world’s largest marine reserve.​ Strange things have been happening in the Antarctic recently – a strange, headless chicken monster from the deep was caught on camera, a perfect rectangular iceberg was spotted by NASA and strange noises have been coming from the ice-shelf. Could this be a sign that the region is screaming for more attention?!   Indeed, even all the noise ahead of the meeting – from world-renowned actors, former Presidents, formidable Ocean explorers, high-level influencers and even rock bands – was still not enough to ensure the world’s last wilderness is protected. In the next 12 months, leading up to the next CCAMLR meeting, we need to continue to work together and support the proponent countries to ensure support for Southern Ocean MPAs does not melt away and a network of MPAs in the region will be established, covering at least 7 million km2 by 2020 and boosting Ocean protection by an order of magnitude greater than anything achieved before.    Indonesia’s Our Ocean racks up new commitments Since its inception in 2014, the Our Ocean Conference has become a milestone on the Ocean calendar – a feel-good forum where governments, NGOs, companies and organizations can showcase their work, make commitments and profile new initiatives. This year's Our Ocean was no exception. According to the Conference's official website, this year’s meeting resulted in 305 tangible and measurable commitments, US$10.7 billion of monetary commitments and 14 million km2 of MPAs. That is an impressive achievement. Indonesia's 23 commitments alone amounted to over US$80 million. See here for a full list of commitments.   A large number of announcements were made including big-hitting initiatives to protect fisheries and a New Plastics Global Economy Commitment that brings together key players responsible for producing 20% of all plastic packaging globally.​ The Pew Bertarelli Ocean Ambassadors group was launched, led by John Kerry and David Cameron, that focuses on supporting countries’ efforts to strongly protect at least 30% of the Ocean by 2030. The Caribbean Accelerator, a Coalition of over 26 Caribbean governments and 40 global companies, financial institutions, and foundations, also announced a commitment to invest up to US$1billion in private and public funds to build a climate smart Caribbean. Insurance giant AXA XL continued its leadership of focus on ocean risk, driving an insurance-led multi-sector collaboration and action to build ocean resilience. Luckily, it seems as if these commitments are not just a flash in the Ocean conservation pan – and when it comes to MPAs, the commitments are being thoroughly followed up. A review of progress in meeting the Our Ocean MPA commitments by Oregon State University was presented at the meeting by MPA guru and Ocean Unite Network member, Jane Lubchenco and showed that 46% of all the actions were completed, 49% made progress and just 5% saw no progress.   Indonesia have now handed over the baton to Norway, who will be hosting the Our Ocean Conference in 2019, followed by Palau in 2020.   IMO – progress on Arctic heavy fuel oil ban and plastic ban adopted The recent International Maritime Organization environmental committee meeting (MPEC73) made good progress on working towards a total ban in the Arctic of heavy fuel oil (HFO). Environmental and indigenous organizations strongly welcomed the support of a number of countries for work to commence in February 2019 on developing a ban on the use and carriage of this hugely polluting oil by ships operating in the Arctic. It also adopted an action plan to address marine litter from ships. HFO has no place in Arctic shipping, or anywhere else for that matter. Costs are often cited as a barrier to Arctic shipping cleaning up its act. However, according to a new report  by the green transport group Transport & Environment, the cost of stopping burning HFO in the Arctic and switching to a more sustainable fuel would cost passengers just the price of a glass of wine a day for cruise ships. That seems a pretty small price for people to pay to ensure their holiday doesn’t endanger the Arctic.​   20 new MPAs approved in South Africa South African marine critters are no doubt celebrating the recent announcement that a further network of 20 marine protected areas were approved on 24th October by the South African government. This increases the percentage of protected oceans in South Africa from a measly 0.4% to 5% – just halfway to the Aichi target, but hopefully the beginning of a blue wave towards strongly protecting at least 30% of the country’s massive Exclusive Economic Zone. This is a whopping win for environmental groups working on the #Onlythismuch initiative (including WILDOCEANS, Ocean Unite, WWF, the Centre for Environmental Rights and the South African Association for Marine Biological Research), who have been campaigning for greater protection of South Africa’s waters, as well as all those within government who have worked for years to make this happen. It is also a fitting tribute to the incredible leadership of the Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa, who sadly passed away last month, before she could see her ambitious plan approved. --> Other Key News ICCAT issues report declaring Atlantic bigeye tuna overfished Formerly ‘pristine’ South Atlantic Islands under threat from rafts of plastic bringing alien species, scientists warn Actors get naked for Fishlove’s Campaign to end overfishing   High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world China strictly regulates high-seas fishing; company loses $14.4m in fines Trump signs Ocean plastic pollution law Senegal overfishing leaves an industry in crisis China expands its global governance ambitions in the Arctic Microplastics found in human poop European Parliament approves ban on single-use plastics World’s largest deep-sea octopus nursery discovered The power of purpose: how Adidas will make $1 billion helping solve the problem of Ocean plastic Reuters releases new “Ocean Shock” series on impact of climate change on sea creatures and people Wars over fish increasingly likely as countries use military force to protect 'critical commodity' Billions to be gained in coral reef investment, new analysis shows --> Recent Reports 5 countries hold 70% of world’s last wilderness, according to new global map According to a new study, leatherback turtles frequently cross through as many as 30 different country waters, each with varying levels of protection Polar bears could face extinction as emergency food supply dries up, study finds Venomous sea creatures on the rise thanks to Ocean warming Oceans are changing: new understanding of acidification in Southern Ocean Plankton moving into Arctic waters previously covered with ice could have ‘drastic consequences’ An unsuspected economic engine: marine protected areas Click here for more reports --> Latest Virgin Unite blogs From Bali to the Bottom of the Blue Hole in Belize by Sir Richard Branson The Future of Food That's Protecting The Ocean by Miguel Calatayud, Qualitas Health Eat Last Plastic by Kyle Ellison  Making Cape Verde a leader in Ocean conservation in West Africa by Dr Elisa Dierickx, Fauna & Flora International Click here for more blogs Remember to pass on any of your Ocean news to navigator_info@oceanunite.org Help support our efforts to protect the Ocean by wearing this cool Alex and Ani Charity by Design wave necklace and bracelet. Remember to pass on any of your Ocean news to navigator_info@oceanunite.org Help support our efforts to protect the Ocean by wearing this cool Alex and Ani Charity by Design wave necklace and bracelet. Don’t want to keep receiving these updates? Unsubscribe here. This email was sent to >" target="_blank" style="color:#404040 !important;"><> why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences Ocean Unite · Battleship Building · 179 Harrow Road · London, London W26NB · United Kingdom @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ table#canspamBar td{font-size:14px !important;} table#canspamBar td a{display:block !important; margin-top:10px !important;} }