Breaking Waves: Ocean News

05/22/2018 - 12:10
The Associated Press, CNN and the environmental-focused news organization E&E were barred by the EPA from Scott Pruitt’s event Journalists from national news organizations were barred from a summit in Washington on harmful water contaminants on Tuesday, convened by the embattled environmental protection agency (EPA) chief, Scott Pruitt. One reporter was manhandled out of the building. Pruitt is already engulfed in a scandal over his use of taxpayer money and closeness to lobbyists, actions he has been obliged to defend in a string of congressional hearings in recent weeks, amid calls for him to quit or be fired. He is being investigated for possible federal ethics violations including spending for round-the-clock security guards, first-class plane tickets and a $43,000 soundproof telephone booth. Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 12:04
Proposal would repeal Obama-era rules that ban shooting of bear cubs and other controversial hunting practices in Alaska The Trump administration is attempting to repeal a rule that bans the shooting of bear cubs, use of dogs and bait to hunt bears, and killing caribou from motorboats in Alaska’s federal wildlife refuges. The proposal would scrap a 2015 regulation by the National Park Service that restricts controversial hunting and trapping practices on about 20m acres of federal land in Alaska. Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 09:50
On international day for biological diversity, the IUCN celebrates successful conservation action with images and stories of 12 species and the efforts underway to improve their status Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 09:48
The wildlife presenter has revealed he is storing roadkill in his freezer to feed foxes, as recent reports suggest their numbers are in sharp decline The next time you’re at Chris Packham’s house, rifling through his kitchen looking for a snack, for God’s sake, don’t look in the freezer. That’s where Packham keeps his “enormous quantity” of roadkill. What exactly is Packham doing with an enormous quantity of roadkill in his freezer? It’s a fair question. Should a nationally renowned wildlife presenter be running over wildlife in the first place? Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 09:21
Oil firm grilled over carbon emissions, but defeats motion calling for tougher targets Shell investors have rebelled over the company’s executive pay, as the Anglo-Dutch oil company came under pressure to take stronger action on climate change. While chief executive Ben van Beurden’s €8.9m (£7.79m) pay package for 2017 was approved, more than a quarter of shareholders voted against the firm’s remuneration report at its annual general meeting on Tuesday. Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 09:21
Foreign secretary says Nord Stream 2 could leave Europe reliant on ‘malign’ Russia The UK foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, has joined the US in condemning “divisive” German plans to press ahead with the construction of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline from Russia to Germany, arguing it could leave European energy consumers heavily dependent on “a malign Russian state”. The giant pipeline, and the terms on which it is built, has become the litmus test of a dispute on how Europe can reach a working relationship with Moscow and yet defend its liberal values from a Russian threat. Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 08:30
Ocean Leadership ~ (Credit: Getty/George Rose) The United States and China share a deep common interest in ocean protection. The world’s ocean and coastal resources are currently under threat from overfishing, pollution, and unchecked resource extraction. Global ocean health is declining rapidly and has already reached crisis levels. (From American Progress) — As the largest ocean stakeholders—with unparalleled dependence on seaborne trade, the economic vitality of coastal cities, and the production and consumption of living marine resources—the United States and China face new, increasing economic and security risks from the degradation of global ocean health. Yet the ocean also represents a tremendous opportunity for the two countries to turn this trend around. The marine environment has a proven capacity to heal and rebuild itself under proper management, and as the two largest economies in the world, the United States and China have an ability as well as a responsibility to rally other countries on issues relating to the global commons. In the run-up to the 2015 U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties in Paris, it was a bilateral agreement between the United States and China that paved the way for multilateral agreement on a landmark climate accord.1 The same could happen on ocean protection. If the United States and China can forge a common agenda for action, the rest of the world will follow. To be sure, thus far in 2018, the U.S.-China relationship has trended in a direction that has made game-changing cooperation increasingly difficult to achieve—at least in the near term. On the U.S. side, the Trump administration is viewing its policy toward China through a narrow lens that focuses exclusively on trade and North Korea; all other issues struggle to find space on the leadership agenda. That approach prioritizes immediate U.S. concerns but also makes it difficult to pursue and expand bilateral cooperation on broader, longer-term issues, such as ocean protection, where the two nations share common interests and China has a growing capability to contribute to the global commons. While the U.S. and Chinese governments grapple with difficult issues, at a nongovernmental level, their experts have an opportunity to join forces in an effort to lay groundwork for future cooperation on broader issues such as ocean protection. That is exactly what the “Blue Future” dialogue aimed to achieve. Despite the great need and potential for U.S.-China cooperation in this domain, ocean issues remain a relatively unexplored area in U.S.-China relations. Officials from the two countries added a dedicated track on ocean cooperation to the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue in 2015 and 2016. Those preliminary discussions produced or continued a few high-level areas of agreement, including a marine protected area in Antarctica’s Ross Sea and efforts to combat unsustainable fishing, marine pollution, and marine litter.2 Thus far, however, U.S.-China government-to-government discussions have only managed to probe the surface of the two countries’ interests in ocean protection and sustainable development. More work is needed to map out exactly where U.S. and Chinese interests converge, where they diverge, and where the two countries should focus their efforts over the near-, medium-, and long-term… Participants in the June 2016 dialogue CAO Ling, Research Scholar, Stanford University CHEN Jiliang, Researcher, Greenovation Hub Michael Conathan, Director of Ocean Policy, Center for American Progress GUO Peiqing, Professor and Executive Director, Ocean University of China Melanie Hart, Senior Fellow and Director for China Policy, Center for American Progress Michael Jones, President, The Maritime Alliance Beth Kerttula, Former Director, U.S. National Ocean Council, Obama Administration Judith Kildow, Director, National Ocean Economics Program, Center for the Blue Economy LI Shuo, Senior Global Policy Advisor (Climate & Ocean), Greenpeace East Asia LIU Shuguang, Deputy Director and Research Fellow, KRI Institute of Marine Development, Ocean University of China Tabitha Mallory, Affiliate Professor, University of Washington SUN Kai, Faculty, School of Law and Politics, Ocean University of China SUN Song, Director, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences TANG Yi, Professor and Associate Dean of College of Marine Science, Institute of Marine Policy and Law, Shanghai Ocean University Kathleen Walsh, Associate Professor of National Security Affairs, National Security Affairs Department, U.S. Naval War College Rear Adm. Jonathan White, President and CEO, Consortium for Ocean Leadership Sally Yozell, Senior Associate and Director, Environmental Security Program, Stimson Center ZHANG Hongzhou, Research Fellow, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies Dialogue support staff Blaine Johnson, Policy Analyst for China and Asia Policy, Center for American Progress Meredith Leal, Program Coordinator for National Security and International Policy, Center for American Progress Shiva Polefka, Associate Director of Ocean Policy, Center for American Progress Avery Siciliano, Research Associate for Ocean Policy, Center for American Progress Read the full article here: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/green/reports/2018/05/21/451064/blue-future/ The post Blue Future: Mapping Opportunities For U.S.-China Ocean Cooperation appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
05/22/2018 - 05:54
As the fifth annual Great British Bee Count gets under way, wildlife and gardening experts are calling on the public to grow weeds to help Britain’s bees. The count, which will provide the first national health check for wild bees and other pollinators, runs until 30 June Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 05:00
In June, a California groundskeeper will make history by taking company to trial on claims it suppressed harm of Roundup At the age of 46, DeWayne Johnson is not ready to die. But with cancer spread through most of his body, doctors say he probably has just months to live. Now Johnson, a husband and father of three in California, hopes to survive long enough to make Monsanto take the blame for his fate. On 18 June, Johnson will become the first person to take the global seed and chemical company to trial on allegations that it has spent decades hiding the cancer-causing dangers of its popular Roundup herbicide products – and his case has just received a major boost. Continue reading...
05/22/2018 - 04:11
Charity says at least 65 people have died in Pakistani city as temperatures exceed 40C An intense heatwave across south Asia has killed dozens of people with sustained temperatures in excess of 40C (104F) coinciding with power cuts and Ramadan, when many Muslims avoid eating or drinking water. At least 65 people have died in Karachi in recent days according to the charitable organisation that runs the central morgue in the Pakistani port city, as volunteers handed out water to labourers and others working outside in temperatures as high as 44C. Continue reading...