Breaking Waves: Ocean News

10/15/2018 - 10:00
Extreme weather damage to the global barley crop will mean price spikes and supply problems, according to new research Trouble is brewing for the world’s beer drinkers, with climate change set to cause “dramatic” price spikes and supply shortages, according to new research. Extreme heatwaves and droughts will increasingly damage the global barley crop, meaning a common ingredient of the world’s favourite alcoholic beverage will become scarcer. Key brewing nations are forecast to be among the worst hit, including Belgium, the Czech Republic and Ireland. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 09:39
Ocean Leadership ~ The Marine Policy Center at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) invites exceptional candidates to apply for up to two full-time tenure-track positions. The staff at the Policy Center conducts social scientific research that integrates economics, policy analysis, and law with the Institution’s basic research in ocean sciences. The successful candidate will have research interests that complement our existing interdisciplinary strengths in marine resource economics. We welcome applications from scientists—including social scientists and others who focus on quantitative policy analysis—who use either empirical or theoretical approaches to address questions in any area of marine policy. Candidates whose research lies at the intersection of marine science and the economics of public health; food, water, and energy; or ecosystem management are particularly encouraged to apply. Applicants should have a doctoral degree and a record of research publications in scholarly journals. Scientific staff members are expected to develop independent, externally-funded, and internationally-recognized research programs. They also have the option of advising graduate students and teaching courses through the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography and Oceanographic Engineering. Opportunities for interdisciplinary research exist through collaborations with colleagues in the other science departments, centers, and labs as well as with researchers in the broader Woods Hole scientific community. WHOI’s Scientific Staff are expected to provide for their salaries from grants and contracts. The Institution provides salary support when no other funding is available, as well as significant internal funding opportunities for developing innovative research projects. Candidates hired at the junior level will receive an initial appointment for four years with salary guaranteed. HOW TO APPLY: Please visit http://jobs.whoi.edu and respond to Job Reference 18-10-02. Applicants should include, as a single PDF document: a cover letter, curriculum vitae, three-page research statement, names and contact information of four references, and copies of up to three relevant publications. The package should also be sent separately to Michael Neubert, Director of the Marine Policy Center at mpc_director@whoi.edu with the subject line “MPC Application.” Review of applications will begin on 12/17/2018. WHOI is a member of the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC). Please visit HERC for more information. WHOI is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer/Disabled/Veterans/M/F. We encourage Veterans and those with Disabilities to apply. Applications are reviewed confidentially. Applicants that require accommodation in the job application process are encouraged to contact us at (508) 289-2253 or email eeo@whoi.edu for assistance. The post Assistant Scientist in Marine Policy Center, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) (Dec. 17) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
10/15/2018 - 09:34
As Cuadrilla starts operations in Lancashire, we examine the main arguments Fracking protesters blockade Lancashire site as work begins Fracking restarted in the UK on Monday – the first such operation since 2011. The oil and gas firm Cuadrilla commenced work at a well in Lancashire after seeing off a last-minute legal challenge on Friday. The aim is to extract shale gas to contribute to the country’s energy supply but environmental campaigners fiercely oppose it. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 07:48
Critics demand tougher action as Bank of England stops short of call for mandatory reports The Bank of England has stopped short of forcing financial companies to disclose the potential risks they face from climate change, despite growing calls from campaigners for such action. In a warning to finance firms to vastly improve their planning to safeguard against the financial risks posed by global warming, Threadneedle Street asked companies to “consider the relevance” of disclosing their climate-related risks. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 05:49
Unusual collaboration between upmarket department store and frozen food specialist is because both have committed to going palm-oil-free Boxes of Iceland mince pies have made a low-key debut in Selfridges’ food halls this year, sharing the aisles with £1,450 tins of beluga caviar and £5,000 Christmas hampers. The unusual collaboration between the upmarket department store and the frozen food specialist is on sustainability grounds, as both retailers seek to boost their environmental credentials by committing to removing palm oil from their own-brand ranges. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 05:00
Cut carbon pollution as much as possible, as fast as possible The Paris climate agreement set a target of no more than 2°C global warming above pre-industrial temperatures, but also an aspirational target of no more than 1.5°C.  That’s because many participating countries – especially island nations particularly vulnerable to sea level rise – felt that even 2°C global warming is too dangerous.  But there hadn’t been a lot of research into the climate impacts at 1.5°C vs. 2°C, and so the UN asked the IPCC to publish a special report summarizing what it would take to achieve the 1.5°C limit and what the consequences would be of missing it. The details in the report are worth understanding, but there’s one simple critical takeaway point: we need to cut carbon pollution as much as possible, as fast as possible. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 03:19
Operations start at Lancashire site after protesters block entrance and nearby road Fracking has begun in the UK for the first time since 2011 despite an attempt by protesters to blockade the entrance to the Lancashire site. Activists from campaign group Reclaim the Power used a van to block the entrance to a site on Preston New Road near Blackpool for 12 hours from 4.30am on Monday, but the shale gas company Cuadrilla said all the equipment it needed to frack was already there and it had started the process by 1pm. Continue reading...
10/15/2018 - 00:48
Climate scientists have political agendas, US president says in interview with 60 Minutes Donald Trump has reiterated his doubts about climate change, suggesting that the climate could “change back again,” and that climate scientists are politically motivated. The US president has long questioned man-made global warming. In an interview with CBS programme 60 Minutes that aired Sunday night, he said that he no longer believes climate change is a hoax, as he tweeted in 2012. Continue reading...
10/14/2018 - 17:56
Often heard before it is seen, the kererū has been known to fall out of the odd tree after too much fermented fruit A native green and bronze wood pigeon with a taste for fermented fruit has been named the 2018 bird of the year in New Zealand. The kererū is endemic to the country and can be found in both the North and South islands, living in cities as well as rural areas. Although quiet and reclusive by nature, kererū have earned a reputation as the drunkest bird in New Zealand, and been known to fall from trees after consuming rotting fruit left lying on the ground. During the summer when fruit is in abundance drunk kererū are sometimes taken to wildlife centres to sober up. Continue reading...
10/14/2018 - 13:52
State politicians and Oregon occupation leader Ammon Bundy address gathering against federal land management At a conference in Whitefish, Montana, on Saturday Ammon Bundy, a leader of a group which occupied federal land in 2016, shared a stage with Republican politicians, campaigners against Indian treaty rights and other rightwing groups. Related: Rebel cowboys: how the Bundy family sparked a new battle for the American west Continue reading...