Breaking Waves: Ocean News

Incorporating biofunctionality into nanomaterials for medical, environmental devices
03/22/2010 - 13:00
Researchers have discovered how to use atomic layer deposition to incorporate "biological functionality" into complex nanomaterials, which could lead to a new generation of medical and environmental health applications. For example, the researchers show how the technology can be used to develop effective, low-cost water purification devices that could be used in developing countries.
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New research cuts into origins of iron and steel in India
03/21/2010 - 23:00
Researchers in the UK have returned from a six-week archaeological research expedition to a remote region of rural Andhra Pradesh in India. The team studied the origins of high carbon steel-making in the southern Indian sub-continent.
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Cup plant is potential new biomass/carbon storage crop
03/21/2010 - 23:00
American researchers are exploring a native perennial called the cup plant as a potential new biomass crop that could also store carbon in its extensive root system and add biodiversity to biomass plantings.
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Bird bones may be hollow, but they are also heavy
03/21/2010 - 23:00
For centuries biologists have known that bird bones are hollow, and even elementary school children know that bird skeletons are lightweight to offset the high energy cost of flying. Nevertheless, many people are surprised to learn that bird skeletons do not actually weigh any less than the skeletons of similarly sized mammals. In other words, the skeleton of a two-ounce songbird weighs just as much as the skeleton of a two-ounce rodent.
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Fossilized feces research produces new evidence related to giant crocodile
03/21/2010 - 23:00
Ancient bite marks and fossilized feces discovered in Georgia are providing new details about a giant crocodile that roamed the Southeast United States about 79 million years ago.
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How dinosaurs rose to prominence
03/21/2010 - 23:00
How did dinosaurs become rulers of Earth more than 200 million years ago? Widespread volcanism and a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide wiped out half of all plant species, and extinguished early crocodile relatives that had competed with the earliest dinosaurs, according to experts.
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Marine conditions of Aralar mountain range of 120 million years ago
03/21/2010 - 23:00
The Early Aptian (120 million years ago) was an age of intense volcanic activity on Earth, eruptions that emitted large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, thus causing a revolution in the carbon cycle. As a consequence, great changes happened in the whole of the terrestrial system. A researcher in Spain has studied how these changes happened in the marine environment of the Aralar mountain range (at that time it was under the sea) in the Basque Country, and found more than one surprise.
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Rare lady beetles prefer traditional diet
03/21/2010 - 23:00
Experts watched helplessly as a colony of rare, captive lady beetles was lost in 2008, then teetered on the edge of disaster again in 2009.
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Tectonics: Precision is hallmark of 20-year study
03/21/2010 - 23:00
When it comes to 3-D puzzles, Rubik's Cube pales in comparison with the latest creation from a team of geophysicists. They have just put the finishing touches on a 20-year effort to precisely describe the relative movements of the interlocking tectonic plates that make up about 97 percent of Earth's surface.
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Clean snowmobile challenge tests lower-emission, quieter sleds
03/21/2010 - 23:00
Neither sun, nor mud, nor atypically warm March weather in northern Michigan could keep three hardy entries from completing the Endurance Run at the 2010 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge.
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